Eight Signs You Are Ready to Retire

Roddy MarinoRoddy Marino, CIMA, Executive Vice President
National Accounts & Distribution

New England Patriots quarterback is famous, and infamous, for a number of things both on and off the football field. His stance on retirement, however, is a personal favorite. When asked when he will retire, the then 37-year old quarterback said, “When I suck.”

Brady has the benefit of stats, sacks and millions of armchair quarterbacks to tell him when it’s time for him to hang up his cleats, but the decision to retire isn’t as clear for most Americans.

According to a survey conducted by Ameriprise Financial, nearly half of retirees (47%) felt ready to retire, but approached it with mixed emotions. 25% of the people surveyed said they could hardly wait for retirement, but nearly as many (21%) felt uncertain or felt that they were just not ready.[1]

If you are among the group of pre-retirees who feel uncertainty, here are eight signs that will help you decide if the time is right for you to consider retirement:

  1. shutterstock_447538888You are emotionally ready. Choosing when to retire has as much to do with emotions as it does finances. The transition from a full-time job that, for many, shaped their identity, to life with less structure can be scary. According to the Ameriprise study, losing connections with colleagues (37%), getting used to a different routine (32%), and finding purposeful ways to pass the time (22%) pose the greatest challenge for the newly-retired. Despite these challenges, 65%say they fell into their new routine fairly quickly, and half (52%) report to having less time on their hands than they would have thought.
  2. You’ve paid down your debt. Debt represents a key barometer in retirement readiness. If possible, you will want to keep working until your high-interest credit card debt, personal loans or auto loans have been satisfied—or you have a plan to retire such debt.
  3. You have an emergency fund. It’s important to plan in advance for how you will address emergencies, big and small, in retirement. The same survey revealed that 90% of Americans have endured at least one setback that harmed their retirement savings. Setbacks vary from caring for adult children, to college expenses stretching over six years instead of four. Others include loss of a job, assisted living expenses, and disappointing stock performance. As the survey indicates, unexpected life events cost the retirement accounts of the respondents $117,000 on average. An emergency fund can serve to prevent you from having to resort to retirement savings during hard financial times.
  4. You know what it’s going to cost. Some people believe they will enjoy a significant decrease in post-retirement expenses; however, that may not be the case. Instead, many retirees experience trade-off in expenses. For example, instead of daily commute costs, retirees may take longer trips thereby canceling out any savings in transportation expenses. Most retirees’ expenses follow a U-shaped pattern. For the first few years, the expenses mimic pre-retirement expenses, then as the retiree settles in, expenses dip only to rise as health care costs kick in.
  5. You know how you will create income. Much of retirement planning involves asset accumulation, but it is equally important to figure out what assets to tap, and in what order. Your income plan should include a decision on when you will elect to receive Social Security benefits. It should also take into consideration all sources of income including fixed, immediate, and indexed annuity strategies, pensions, and even your house. It should also address the timing as to when and you will withdraw income from all potential sources.
  6. Your children have their financial lives in order. Family dynamics play a significant role in shaping one’s retirement experience, yet are often overlooked during the planning process. Many retirees do not anticipate or underestimate the financial toll associated with providing financial support to their adult children. If you are thinking of retiring and still have a financially dependent child, consider establishing parameters for the arrangement, set expectations, and deepen the child’s understanding and appreciation of what is at stake for you.
  7. You have prioritized your health. When it comes to determining retirement well-being, health is typically more important than wealth. Retirees in better health have the added peace of mind that comes from financial security. They tend to enjoy retirement more, feel fulfilled and are not as prone to negative emotions as their less healthy counterparts.[2] For most, health care costs top the retirement expenses charts so your ability to pay for medical care you will eventually need should be a key consideration. Healthy habits and preventive medical treatment before retirement can help to serve as a cost-containment measurement as well as a lifestyle booster.
  8. shutterstock_128132981Someone you trust can help you make your financial decisions. A trusted advisor is invaluable throughout your retirement journey. He or she can help you manage your retirement portfolio to meet your preservation and growth objectives, help you establish an income strategy matched to your spending needs, and track your spending versus assumptions. If a crisis arises, a trusted financial advisor will already know your financial history and can help make decisions that are in your best interests. Similarly, it is extremely helpful to have a trusted advisor relationship solidified in the event your cognitive abilities decline, and you need help with decisions.

[1] Ameriprise Study: First Wave of Baby Boomers Say Health and Emotional Preparation Are Keys to a Successful Retirement, 2/3/15: http://newsroom.ameriprise.com/news/ameriprise-study-first-wave-baby-boomers-say-health-and-emotional-preparation-are-keys-to-successful-retirement.htm

[2] Health, Wealth and Happiness in Retirement, MassMutual. 3/25/15

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

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