Guiding Your Child to Financial Independence

John_SolomonJohn Solomon, Executive Vice President, Wealth Advisory

Good money management is a fine example of a skill best learned young. The earlier your child gains control over their financial world, the more time your child has to make thoughtful decisions that bring them closer to financial freedom and the fulfillment of their life goals.

You can guide your child towards financial independence by imparting these valuable lessons:

Promote Him/Her to Account Manager

The best way to encourage financial responsibility is to make your child responsible for their financial decisions.

When your child is young, you most likely make all of the financial decisions for them. You probably opened their first bank account when he or she was just an infant. You instruct when to make a deposit and when money should be withdrawn.

At some point, well before the child reaches the age of maturity and can legally take independent action on the account, you should begin to cede some control. The child should start to take on the responsibility that comes with managing the account, getting comfortable with the decision-making needed to guide financial growth. After all, this is the money that will fund future whims.

Once children feel ownership over some pool of money, it should be the source of funding for non-essential items. As the account manager, the child then must decide whether he or she wants something badly enough to take money out of their account. If money is spent from the account, your child will have to figure out how to replenish it. Discretionary purchases exceeding the amount available in the account should be discouraged, to emphasize the notion that money is a limited resource.

Let Consequences Teach

There comes a time in a young adult’s life when they must live with the consequences of their decisions and circumstances. For example, often young drivers fail to consider insurance, fuel, and routine maintenance when they calculate how much they can afford to spend on a car. Increased expenses are a natural consequence of car ownership. Sometimes, these overlooked costs dawn on the teen only after the uninsured car is in the driveway, with an empty gas tank. This is a prime time for natural consequences teach the lesson. If you swoop in to protect your child from a painful lesson, they learn an entirely different lesson. They learn that when their money runs out, they simply need to tap into yours.

Encouraging Surfing

Before your child makes a purchase, insist upon comparison shopping. Encourage your son or daughter to surf the internet to explore the best deals available.

Make Them Honor Financial Commitments

Teenagers can come up with all kinds of creative excuses for not following through. Backing out of commitments, especially financial commitments, should be non-negotiable. If your child asks you to float them some money for an impulse purchase, make them pay you back. If your child agrees to shovel a driveway or babysit a neighbor, make sure they show up, on time and ready to work.

Set Guidelines

Before your child receives his or her first paycheck, you should talk about the importance of saving for both short- and long-term goals. Set the expectation that each a certain percentage of pay period should go towards meeting those objectives.

Give Incentives

Some children seem hardwired to spend their money as quickly as it is earned while others save every penny. To encourage saving, consider providing financial incentives. For example, you may deposit $10 for every $100 your child puts in the bank.

Give Them a Peek

Many families don’t talk about money. Parents often worry their child will misconstrue the information, share it with others, become complacent, or endure an unnecessary burden. When you explain certain aspects of your financial life to your child, however, it provides context and clarity to your decisions. It also allows you to talk about what money means to you. Nothing makes an example clearer for a child as when you explain trade-offs you have made in your life, like buying a smaller house closer to work, so you spend less time commuting and more time with the family.

The Brinker Capital Wealth Advisory team delivers exceptional service and support to meet the unique wealth management needs of high-net-worth and ultra-high-net-worth investors, family offices, institutions, and endowments.The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

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