Stress Contagion, the DOL and You

Crosby_2015Dr. Daniel Crosby, Executive Director, The Center for Outcomes & Founder, Nocturne Capital

Yawn.

YAWN.

Yaaaaaawwwwwwn.

Are you yawning after reading this? I’m fighting back the urge myself after writing the word three times—what gives? The answer to this extreme suggestibility lies with what scientists call mirror neurons—neurons that fire when an action is being performed and when that same action is being observed. The original discovery of mirror neurons took place in a sleepy, somewhat overlooked research lab in Parma, Italy. Scientists there were studying the brains of macaque monkeys in an effort to understand how the brain organizes motor behavior. As Martin Lindstrom explains, the scientists quickly discovered some things that challenged their assumptions about how the brain works:

“They observed that the macaques’ pre-motor neurons would light up not just when the monkeys reached for that nut, but also when they saw other monkeys reaching for a nut.” (Buyology)

Whether an action was performed by the monkey or merely observed, the effect on the brain was identical.

Stranger still was what they observed one sweltering afternoon when a graduate student on the team entered the lab with an ice cream cone. One of the monkeys, still hooked up to the monitoring apparatus, was staring greedily at the frosty treat. As the student brought the ice cream closer for a lick, the macaque’s pre-motor region began lighting up the screen:

“It hadn’t moved its arm or taken a lick of ice cream; it wasn’t even holding anything at all. But simply by observing the student bringing the ice cream cone to his mouth, the monkey’s brain had mentally imitated the very same gesture.” (Buyology)

shutterstock_153551429Mirror neurons are the reason why you cry in a sad movie, cringe at the sight of someone else eating something gross, or close your eyes when the chainsaw-wielding local stumbles upon the unsuspecting group of college kids at the lake house. Mirror neurons are why “unboxing” videos exist (seriously, it’s a thing), because it’s nearly as fun to watch someone else open a new gaming system or expensive toy as it is to do it ourselves. To truly apply this learning, give your children a video of other children opening presents at their next birthday party and tell them Dr. Crosby told you it’s more or less the same thing!

At this point you as a financial advisor may be thinking, “this all makes sense” and simultaneously wondering, “what does this have to do with me and my work?” It has been my anecdotal experience that just as married couples tend to resemble one another over time, the clients of financial advisors tend to behave much like the advisors with whom they work.

There may be some self-selection at work here but even more powerful are the cues that clients take from their advisors with each interaction. If your office has CNBC on loop and is stockpiled with magazines devoted to the hot stocks du jour, don’t be surprised when clients lead with griping about performance instead of sticking to their plan. Likewise, if you telegraph panic and are prone to complaining about politics and capital markets, don’t be surprised when your own fears land on your doorstop in the form of hand-wringing clients.

shutterstock_108406256The DOL’s “conflicts of interest” rule was announced yesterday, and with that will come the questions and uncertainty inherent in any new piece of legislation. Bearing in mind the concept of stress contagion, I would encourage you to consider the ways in which your clients will look to you as a leader and follow your example when sifting through their own feelings about this legislation in general and your value to them in specific. Change, it would seem, is coming, but one of the core beliefs of The Center for Outcomes is that periods of disruption provide opportunities for differentiation for the truly prepared. Whatever changes may come, your value to your clients and your position as a leader are steadfast and must be positioned as such.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

Tech Talk: Adding Value Through Technology

Brendan McConnellBrendan McConnell, Vice President, Business Administration

I recently participated on an advisor technology panel at the 2014 FSI OneVoice event in Washington, D.C. One of the topics of conversation highlighted the number of new technologies available and what technology an advisor should consider adopting. It starts with creating a solid technology foundation.

Financial services, not unlike most other industries, is a competitive landscape where it can be difficult to separate yourself from the pack, so to speak. There are a lot of skilled institutions and personnel promoting similar products and services. Embracing the right technology is one way to differentiate yourself. Adding technology to your practice can be disruptive, but a firm with the right appetite for change finds success in transforming the customer experience. Let’s look at a few tools and concepts you should start considering adding to your business.

Adopt a Customer Relationship Management (CRM) System
CRM systems are designed to help you manage your business more strategically and efficiently. They serve as the ecosystem where all relevant business data exists—from client contact information and account data, to prospect opportunities and service requests. Your CRM is the hub around which all other technology revolves. Most CRMs are now offered as cloud-based technology, giving you access anywhere on any mobile device and eliminating the need to support the technology infrastructure. The cloud delivery also makes CRM much more affordable. Use CRM systems to automate workflows and eliminate those time-consuming, manual procedures. Set up alerts so that you know when a new proposal is run or an account hits a specific threshold. Have emails proactively sent to your clients when a service case is completed or for an anniversary or birthday. Time is your most valued resource, add more of it through a properly implemented CRM system.

Adopt a CRM SystemIf you are currently using a CRM, your future technology choices should include an evaluation of integration with your system. Think of your CRM like a power strip that all other technology plugs into. This will provide you with a simplified infrastructure with one source and a single log in. If you are shopping for a CRM, take a look at your current core system, software, and platforms and find the CRM that will integrate best with your existing technology. If you follow this strategy it will eliminate the siloed technology approach, which often leads to inefficiencies.

Improve the Client Onboarding Process
As important as embracing technology is to your internal processes and procedures, it’s vital for enhancing the client experience. This is where you prove to the client that you add more value than simply serving their investment needs. A recent Fidelity RIA Benchmarking survey found that 77% of high-performing firms were focused on using technology to enhance the customer experience and satisfaction.

Client onboarding, for example, is an area worth the technological investment. Tools that allow for pre-population of forms, applications that allow secure, electronic signatures, using CRM data to customize templates—all of these enhancements create a unique and personal experience for the client. And we all know the adage “a happy customer is a loyal customer.” In addition, a paperless workflow technology can provide a tremendous amount of efficiency and process standardization that can help reduce resources required (time and money) and help eliminate mistakes.

Customization is KeyProvide Customizable Client Reports
What about the ongoing servicing of existing clients? Client reporting, much like the onboarding process, helps enhance and maintain successful relationships. Each one of your clients has an investing objective that is personal to them. You need to be able to provide them with a custom report that shows how they are measuring against their goals rather than trying to fit them into a predefined template. The one-size-fits-all model is no longer going to meet your clients’ expectations for the evolving world of goals-based investing.

The driver behind successful adoption of technology for any practice is internal participation. You must have buy-in within your organization or practice. Whether a one-man show or a team of 20, everyone has to commit in order to maintain a culture of innovation. With proper adoption of technology, enhanced client experience and satisfaction will be within reach.