Money Missteps to Avoid in Retirement

frank_randallFrank Randall, AIF®, Regional Director, Retirement Plan Services

 “Good decisions come from experience,

and experience comes from bad decisions.”

By the time you feel ready enough to retire, you have likely had your fair share of blunders along the way. Now seasoned with experience, the realization that mistakes are inevitable, and having the ability to recover can make the difference between success and failure.

Here are some of the most common missteps in retirement:

  • Focusing on the wrong factors. Many people decide to retire when they reach a certain age, job fluctuations or business cycles. While these factors may have influence, your emotional readiness, savings, debt, future budget and income plan to sustain your desired lifestyle must also be considered.
  • Overlooking the importance of your Social Security election. Some experts say the difference between a good Social Security benefit election and a poor one could equate to more than $100,000 in income.[1] The biggest decision retirees face concerning Social Security is when to start collecting. Just because you can start receiving benefits at age 62 doesn’t necessarily mean you should. If you delay your election until age 70, you may receive 32% more in payments so it may make sense to delay receipt of benefits as long as you can meet your expense obligations.
  • Underestimating the cost of retirement. Most people estimate retirement expenses to be around 85% of after-tax working income. In reality, however, many retirees experience lifestyle sticker-shock as the realities of retirement. One common problem retirees have when budgeting for retirement expenses is that they overlook items like inflation, future taxes, health care, home and car maintenance, and the financial dependence of their loved ones (e.g., sandwich generation costs).
  • Retiring with too much debt. A simple rule of thumb is to pay off as much debt as possible during your earning years. Otherwise, debt repayment will cause a strain on your retirement savings.
  • Failing to come up with an income strategy. Saving is only part of the retirement planning process. You also have to think about spending and decide where and in what order to tap investments. When thinking about cash flow needs throughout retirement, one must also consider how retirement funds can continue to generate growth. An effective way to solve retirement income needs is to have a liquid cash reserve account tied to your portfolio.  The reserve is tapped to deliver a “paycheck” to help you meet predictable expenses. The cash withdrawn is replenished by investments in dividend- and income-producing securities.
  • Dialing too far back on investment risk. As many workers near retirement, they become fixated on cash needs, thus dialing back risk and becoming more conservative in their investments. Unfortunately, the returns generated by ultra-conservative investments may not keep pace with inflation and future tax liabilities. Because retirement can last upwards of 20 years, retirees must set both preservation and growth investment objectives.
  • Not validating the assumptions made during the retirement planning process. You make certain assumptions about investment performance, expenses, and retirement age when you initially create your projected retirement plan. At least annually, you should reconcile your projections against reality. Are you spending more and earning less than anticipated? If so, you may have to make changes, either to your plan or your lifestyle.
  • Providing financial support to adult children. Over the last decade, the number of adult children who live with their parents has risen 15% to a historic high of 36%. Providing financial support to anyone, particularly an adult child, is stressful. It could strain retirement savings and ultimately could create long-term financial dependency in your child.
  • Going it alone. While your financial mission in retirement may seem straightforward—don’t outlive your money—the decisions you make along the way can be complicated. An experienced financial advisor can give you piece of mind for many reasons. An advisor can help you manage your retirement portfolio to meet your preservation and growth objectives, help you establish an income strategy that is matched to your spending needs, and track your spending versus assumptions. If a crisis arises, a trusted financial advisor will already know your financial history and can help make decisions that are in your best interests. Similarly, it is extremely helpful to have a trusted advisor relationship solidified in the event your cognitive abilities decline and you need help with decisions.

[1] http://www.cbsnews.com/news/a-great-new-tool-for-deciding-when-to-take-social-security/

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

Retirement Planning: Beware of the Boomerang

Sue BerginSue Bergin

Unexpected events wreak havoc on many retirees’ portfolios.  According to a recent study, unexpected life events cost retirees on average $117,000. [1]  While caring for an adult child falls in the “unexpected events” category, recent trends suggest it is becoming a commonplace scenario.

The number of young adults, ages 18 to 31, living with their parent’s increased four percentage points from 2007 to 2012.  Now, over one-third (36%) of the young adults in that age category live with their parents.  Many of these adult children have children of their own, adding layers of both complexity and expense.  Pew Research Center attributes the multigenerational dynamic to declining employment, underemployment, rising college enrollment and declining marriage rates.[2]

In a separate survey, Securian Financial Group found that only 10% of the adult children living with their parents contribute to the household finances (e.g., pay rent).[3]  The Pew study reported that 22% of adult children still received an allowance from parents and 80% of the adult children living at home said they did not have enough money to live the life they wanted. Conversely, only 55% of their independent-living counterparts had the same response.

The boomerang-child pattern is nothing new.  It has surfaced during other economic downturns.  However, experts suggest that there may be some generational dynamics at play associated with this current wave of boomerangs that make it different from others. Those dynamics include a pervasive entitlement mindset, inflated self-esteem, and bumpy on- and off-ramps to the labor force.

Bumpy on-ramps refer to the fact that college graduates are having a difficult time finding employment.  Bumpy off-ramps refer to delayed retirements and boomers having to work longer than originally planned for.

While the debate rages as to the merits of adult children returning to the roost, one point is irrefutable.  Boomerang children create a drag on the parents’ retirement.

Boomerangs & Their ImpactIt is natural to want to help your children, at any age.  The child, however, should know the risks that you, as parents, assume if you agree to the arrangement.  The child probably dwells on the relationship risk potential, but should also be aware of the financial and lifestyle risk impact.

If the new financial impact on the parent is left unsaid, it will go unnoticed.  This fact is supported by Securian’s survey of Millennials who live with their parents.  45% of the surveyed young adult demographic said that their living at home has not financial impact on their parents, and almost half of that group said they weren’t even sure of the impact.

Other interesting stats from Securian:

  • Only 4% acknowledge their parents delayed retirement to accommodate the living arrangement
  • 8% said their parents did not request cost-sharing
  • Only 9% of the parents put a pre-determined end date or set conditions for how long the adult child could stay.

There may be tips and tools out there, but working face-to-face with a financial advisor can help add value.  It’s important to assess the financial risk associated with having an adult child come return to live in your home.  A skilled advisor can help project anticipated increases in living expenses as well as the impact on your retirement. This will help establish parameters, set expectations, deepen the child’s understanding of what is at stake for you, and foster open communications. And maybe even make it an enjoyable living situation for all!