Brinker Capital at FSI OneVoice 2017 in San Francisco

Noreen D. BeamanNoreen D. Beaman, Chief Executive Officer

Brinker Capital is proud to be a Premier Sponsor of the Financial Services Institute’s OneVoice 2017 conference in San Francisco, California for the fourth year. This annual gathering provides meaningful education and networking opportunities for members of the independent broker-dealers we serve.

In this atmosphere of uncertainty and opportunity, a significant portion of this year’s agenda is focused on the DOL Fiduciary Rule and its implications to our business. As an industry, we are all facing challenges to address this new rule and need this opportunity to collaborate to find the best solutions for our businesses.

For 30 years, Brinker Capital has acted as an ERISA 3(38) fiduciary to serve in the best interests of our clients. Brinker Capital’s purpose since 1987 has been to implement the ideas of diversification through multi-asset class investing with a disciplined investment approach. By continually enhancing and applying these principles, we strive to deliver better outcomes for financial advisors and their clients.

Brinker Capital is pleased to be a part of a pre-conference workshop on Monday, January 23 that focuses on helping women advance leadership roles within our industry. We will also participate in session tracks that impact our business in the year ahead. On Tuesday, January 24 at 8:00 am, Roddy Marino, EVP of National Accounts and Distribution, will be on a panel discussing the impact of the DOL Fiduciary Rule on independent firms’ fee-based platforms. On Tuesday at 1:30 pm, Avery Cook, SVP of Managed Products and Solutions, will share insights on comprehensive due diligence practices for independent firms. And, as part of the CEO Track on Tuesday at 9:30 am, I will be moderating the “Shifting Sands of Revenue in a Post-DOL World” panel discussion with guests David Canter, EVP of Practice Management and Consulting at Fidelity Clearing & Custody Solutions, Lori Hardwick, COO of Pershing and Susan S. Krawczyk, Partner at Sutherland Asbill & Brennan LLP.

Follow FSI and the event on social media: @FSIwashington #OneVoice17

Thanks for the opportunity FSI, we’re looking forward to a great event!

FSI-open_v2

Eight Signs You Are Ready to Retire

Roddy MarinoRoddy Marino, CIMA, Executive Vice President
National Accounts & Distribution

New England Patriots quarterback is famous, and infamous, for a number of things both on and off the football field. His stance on retirement, however, is a personal favorite. When asked when he will retire, the then 37-year old quarterback said, “When I suck.”

Brady has the benefit of stats, sacks and millions of armchair quarterbacks to tell him when it’s time for him to hang up his cleats, but the decision to retire isn’t as clear for most Americans.

According to a survey conducted by Ameriprise Financial, nearly half of retirees (47%) felt ready to retire, but approached it with mixed emotions. 25% of the people surveyed said they could hardly wait for retirement, but nearly as many (21%) felt uncertain or felt that they were just not ready.[1]

If you are among the group of pre-retirees who feel uncertainty, here are eight signs that will help you decide if the time is right for you to consider retirement:

  1. shutterstock_447538888You are emotionally ready. Choosing when to retire has as much to do with emotions as it does finances. The transition from a full-time job that, for many, shaped their identity, to life with less structure can be scary. According to the Ameriprise study, losing connections with colleagues (37%), getting used to a different routine (32%), and finding purposeful ways to pass the time (22%) pose the greatest challenge for the newly-retired. Despite these challenges, 65%say they fell into their new routine fairly quickly, and half (52%) report to having less time on their hands than they would have thought.
  2. You’ve paid down your debt. Debt represents a key barometer in retirement readiness. If possible, you will want to keep working until your high-interest credit card debt, personal loans or auto loans have been satisfied—or you have a plan to retire such debt.
  3. You have an emergency fund. It’s important to plan in advance for how you will address emergencies, big and small, in retirement. The same survey revealed that 90% of Americans have endured at least one setback that harmed their retirement savings. Setbacks vary from caring for adult children, to college expenses stretching over six years instead of four. Others include loss of a job, assisted living expenses, and disappointing stock performance. As the survey indicates, unexpected life events cost the retirement accounts of the respondents $117,000 on average. An emergency fund can serve to prevent you from having to resort to retirement savings during hard financial times.
  4. You know what it’s going to cost. Some people believe they will enjoy a significant decrease in post-retirement expenses; however, that may not be the case. Instead, many retirees experience trade-off in expenses. For example, instead of daily commute costs, retirees may take longer trips thereby canceling out any savings in transportation expenses. Most retirees’ expenses follow a U-shaped pattern. For the first few years, the expenses mimic pre-retirement expenses, then as the retiree settles in, expenses dip only to rise as health care costs kick in.
  5. You know how you will create income. Much of retirement planning involves asset accumulation, but it is equally important to figure out what assets to tap, and in what order. Your income plan should include a decision on when you will elect to receive Social Security benefits. It should also take into consideration all sources of income including fixed, immediate, and indexed annuity strategies, pensions, and even your house. It should also address the timing as to when and you will withdraw income from all potential sources.
  6. Your children have their financial lives in order. Family dynamics play a significant role in shaping one’s retirement experience, yet are often overlooked during the planning process. Many retirees do not anticipate or underestimate the financial toll associated with providing financial support to their adult children. If you are thinking of retiring and still have a financially dependent child, consider establishing parameters for the arrangement, set expectations, and deepen the child’s understanding and appreciation of what is at stake for you.
  7. You have prioritized your health. When it comes to determining retirement well-being, health is typically more important than wealth. Retirees in better health have the added peace of mind that comes from financial security. They tend to enjoy retirement more, feel fulfilled and are not as prone to negative emotions as their less healthy counterparts.[2] For most, health care costs top the retirement expenses charts so your ability to pay for medical care you will eventually need should be a key consideration. Healthy habits and preventive medical treatment before retirement can help to serve as a cost-containment measurement as well as a lifestyle booster.
  8. shutterstock_128132981Someone you trust can help you make your financial decisions. A trusted advisor is invaluable throughout your retirement journey. He or she can help you manage your retirement portfolio to meet your preservation and growth objectives, help you establish an income strategy matched to your spending needs, and track your spending versus assumptions. If a crisis arises, a trusted financial advisor will already know your financial history and can help make decisions that are in your best interests. Similarly, it is extremely helpful to have a trusted advisor relationship solidified in the event your cognitive abilities decline, and you need help with decisions.

[1] Ameriprise Study: First Wave of Baby Boomers Say Health and Emotional Preparation Are Keys to a Successful Retirement, 2/3/15: http://newsroom.ameriprise.com/news/ameriprise-study-first-wave-baby-boomers-say-health-and-emotional-preparation-are-keys-to-successful-retirement.htm

[2] Health, Wealth and Happiness in Retirement, MassMutual. 3/25/15

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

Brinker Capital at FSI OneVoice 2016 in Orlando

Noreen D. BeamanNoreen D. Beaman, Chief Executive Officer, Brinker Capital

For the third year, Brinker Capital is proud to be a Premier Sponsor of the Financial Services Institute and at the 2016 OneVoice conference in Orlando, Florida next week. This annual gathering is so valuable to us and our strategic partner firms by giving the opportunity to network and learn about the latest within our industry.

During the past few years, we have seen an evolution within the financial services industry. Advisors are now working with third-party providers who integrate their portfolios, practices and reporting. They are no longer simply just offering investment recommendations but changing the conversation with clients and how they deliver investment advice. In addition, they must keep abreast of regulatory changes that are happening within the industry and determine how their practices may be affected.

Brinker Capital understands these changes, and challenges, and is committed to creating a meaningful experience for both advisors and investors, regardless of how our products are accessed. To help our advisors, we work with industry leaders, law firms and custodians to identify how the latest fiduciary rule may impact their business and how we can best serve clients. We are focused on providing advisors with the tools, technology and resources to have more effective conversations with clients and help them embrace goals-based wealth management.

For nearly 30 years Brinker Capital has been committed to being the best strategic partner to financial advisors by bringing accountability, dependability and innovation to every aspect of our business. I am honored to be a part of this year’s Women are from Venus: The Changing Demographics of Women in the Industry and as Clients panel and look forward to an exciting discussion.

Looking forward to connecting with many of you in Orlando!

Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor

Addressing Diversity through Gateway to Leadership

Coyne_HeadshotJohn Coyne, Vice Chairman

“The investment advice profession has a long way to go in reflecting the diversity of America,” so says Elizabeth MacBride in her recent InvestmentNews feature, “A Diversity Problemand she’s not wrong. The financial services industry, as a whole, has too often trailed other professions in terms of diversity among the workforce; but, that’s not to say nothing is being done to address it.

At the Money Management Institute (MMI), the national association for the investment advisory solutions industry, we have cultivated a program that purposefully addresses this issue head-on.

GTL_Logo

The Gateway to Leadership program was established in 2007 and is designed to introduce qualified minority students to the investment advisory solutions business. Through the program, we place candidates from historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in paid summer internships with leading financial services firms and fellow MMI members.

Brinker Capital has been entrenched from the beginning of Gateway to Leadership as our founder Chuck Widger was one of the original architects of the program. I, too, am fortunate to serve as the chairman of this program and have been able to see many participating students come through the doors at Brinker Capital over the last nine years.

While the placement of 160 students across 31 HBCUs into 34 host firms is small in context to the larger issue, we are proud of the program’s growth, success and the enthusiasm to which it has been received by its participants.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

Tech Talk: Disrupting the Industry

Brendan McConnellBrendan McConnell, Chief Operating Officer

Over the last two years we have seen a tremendous amount of change driven by technology in the financial services industry—an industry that has gone from lagging around technology innovation to one that is very much at the forefront. With change comes disruption, and we are beginning to witness a tremendous amount as wealth management firms adjust to offer technology-driven investor experiences.

One recent disruption that has seemingly dominated headlines is that of the online digital advice firms, perhaps more widely known as the “robo advisor.” In most cases, these platforms provide a lower-cost, time-saving alternative for the average investor complete with a more frictionless experience through the use of technology. These firms have set a new baseline around portfolio management, and traditional advisory firms are reacting.

Charles Schwab, Fidelity and Vanguard are three major institutions now offering, or planning to offer, their own digital wealth platforms. They are making a conscious and deliberate investment to deliver this type of technology to the segment of investors who would prefer less human interaction and faster execution of transactions. These platforms also allow the financial advisor to bring additional scale to their own practices.

At Brinker Capital, we hear concerns from financial advisors on how this new class of investment management is impacting the industry and, more importantly, how it’s impacting them. Suffice it to say that the real impact on the rise of technology in the industry will ultimately be a positive impact for advisors and investors. These new technology innovations are making their way into the hands of financial advisors to in turn offer to their clients. This will lead to a more efficient and productive advisor with the ability to serve a broader audience of consumers looking for financial planning and advice. The future-ready advisor will be one that can offer comprehensive financial planning while maximizing the technology available in the industry.

Technology is changing the way consumers view financial advisors. The services that consumers value most from advisors has certainly started to shift. This has upended the advisor value stack. At a recent Fidelity Investment conference, Sanjiv Mirchandani, President at Fidelity National Financial Clearing and Custody, outlined Fidelity’s vision of the future advisor (images below) with a simple and easy-to-understand visual of the current advisor value stack.

The traditional financial advisor value stack:

Advisor_Value_Stack_Traditional

Source: Sanjiv Mirchandani, Fidelity

Now, technology and investor preference has upended and squeezed the top-end of the value stack:

Advisor_Value_Stack

Source: Sanjiv Mirchandani, Fidelity

What Fidelity is identifying here is that investors are putting greater importance on financial planning and behavioral management when selecting a financial advisor. This is the opportunity for a financial advisor to demonstrate their value and justify their fee over the digital advice offering. Fees are less of a concern with advisors who are following this new value model. The new future-ready architecture is one that supports goal-based financial planning and a digital experience. Advisors who focus on these values seem better positioned to succeed in this evolving landscape. Advisors should focus less on the portfolio management, outsourcing these duties, and more on a planning centric client relationship maximized by technology.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are for informational purposes only. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

Chasing Markets

Jeff RauppJeff Raupp, CFA, Senior Investment Manager, Brinker Capital

Back when I was in the U.S. Army, one thing I dreaded was the two-mile run as part of the Physical Fitness (PT) Test. I am not a runner. While most people would scoff at the notion of a two-mile run being intimidating, I looked at it as 13-14 minutes of pain. It was timed, and the better finishing times naturally resulted in a better score. Seemingly anything above 15 minutes resulted in a fail and, of course, more running.

One of the things I had the most trouble with was finding the right pace. I’d have instances where I’d try to run a balanced race only to end up having to sprint the last few hundred yards to reach my desired time. Then there were the times where I’d go out too hard and find myself stumbling into the finish line. The hills on the courses would complicate things – I’d kill myself trying to keep a constant pace uphill and downhill.

shutterstock_175699433After struggling with this for months, I came up with a better solution. We always ran as a group, and I found that I could usually find a few people that would consistently run around the same time I was looking for. Then my objective would be to keep up with them knowing that as long as I finished somewhere in their vicinity, I’d hit my goal.

The other day someone asked me whether investors’ financial goals should be to try to outperform the market, and with my response I thought there were a lot of similarities to my past running strategy.

An investor starts with an objective they’d like to get to, how much money they have, expected cash flows and their time horizon. From there it’s a matter of finding the right mix of asset classes that historically has shown a high probability of achieving the returns necessary to reach the objective(s). That mix can be thought of as your strategic plan.

Along the way, the market is a useful reference point. Investing isn’t a smooth journey, so when your strategy has drawdowns or grows faster than you expected, knowing how markets performed helps you determine if that’s just market volatility or if something may be wrong with your plan. Changing your strategic plan along the way can be dangerous, particularly at market extremes. If you’re always chasing the runner that looks the strongest at the moment, there’s a good chance you’ll burn out before the finish.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are for informational purposes only.