Guiding Your Child to Financial Independence

John_SolomonJohn Solomon, Executive Vice President, Wealth Advisory

Good money management is a fine example of a skill best learned young. The earlier your child gains control over their financial world, the more time your child has to make thoughtful decisions that bring them closer to financial freedom and the fulfillment of their life goals.

You can guide your child towards financial independence by imparting these valuable lessons:

Promote Him/Her to Account Manager

The best way to encourage financial responsibility is to make your child responsible for their financial decisions.

When your child is young, you most likely make all of the financial decisions for them. You probably opened their first bank account when he or she was just an infant. You instruct when to make a deposit and when money should be withdrawn.

At some point, well before the child reaches the age of maturity and can legally take independent action on the account, you should begin to cede some control. The child should start to take on the responsibility that comes with managing the account, getting comfortable with the decision-making needed to guide financial growth. After all, this is the money that will fund future whims.

Once children feel ownership over some pool of money, it should be the source of funding for non-essential items. As the account manager, the child then must decide whether he or she wants something badly enough to take money out of their account. If money is spent from the account, your child will have to figure out how to replenish it. Discretionary purchases exceeding the amount available in the account should be discouraged, to emphasize the notion that money is a limited resource.

Let Consequences Teach

There comes a time in a young adult’s life when they must live with the consequences of their decisions and circumstances. For example, often young drivers fail to consider insurance, fuel, and routine maintenance when they calculate how much they can afford to spend on a car. Increased expenses are a natural consequence of car ownership. Sometimes, these overlooked costs dawn on the teen only after the uninsured car is in the driveway, with an empty gas tank. This is a prime time for natural consequences teach the lesson. If you swoop in to protect your child from a painful lesson, they learn an entirely different lesson. They learn that when their money runs out, they simply need to tap into yours.

Encouraging Surfing

Before your child makes a purchase, insist upon comparison shopping. Encourage your son or daughter to surf the internet to explore the best deals available.

Make Them Honor Financial Commitments

Teenagers can come up with all kinds of creative excuses for not following through. Backing out of commitments, especially financial commitments, should be non-negotiable. If your child asks you to float them some money for an impulse purchase, make them pay you back. If your child agrees to shovel a driveway or babysit a neighbor, make sure they show up, on time and ready to work.

Set Guidelines

Before your child receives his or her first paycheck, you should talk about the importance of saving for both short- and long-term goals. Set the expectation that each a certain percentage of pay period should go towards meeting those objectives.

Give Incentives

Some children seem hardwired to spend their money as quickly as it is earned while others save every penny. To encourage saving, consider providing financial incentives. For example, you may deposit $10 for every $100 your child puts in the bank.

Give Them a Peek

Many families don’t talk about money. Parents often worry their child will misconstrue the information, share it with others, become complacent, or endure an unnecessary burden. When you explain certain aspects of your financial life to your child, however, it provides context and clarity to your decisions. It also allows you to talk about what money means to you. Nothing makes an example clearer for a child as when you explain trade-offs you have made in your life, like buying a smaller house closer to work, so you spend less time commuting and more time with the family.

The Brinker Capital Wealth Advisory team delivers exceptional service and support to meet the unique wealth management needs of high-net-worth and ultra-high-net-worth investors, family offices, institutions, and endowments.The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

Safeguarding the Family Enterprise: Children and Wealth

Tom WilsonTom Wilson, Managing Director, Private Client Group &
Senior Investment Manager

A blog in a continuing series on the safeguarding of the family enterprise.

There is a Chinese proverb that goes, “Wealth does not pass three generations.”  This fits the notion that when significant wealth is created by the first generation of a family, the second generation gets to enjoy it, but the third generation, which was so far removed from the work ethic of the first generation, squanders it.

The conversation of wealth is often missed between parents and children.  For wealthy parents, discussing money with children can be a daunting task.  When is the best age to discuss the subject?  How much is too much information?  What if I want to give my money away to charity?  The stress surrounding these questions can often prevent these conversations from taking place.

Safguarding the Family EnterpriseWhile these questions, and others, are difficult to bring up, they are essential.  They will provide the context to determine the balance between providing enough money so that the children can pursue their dreams without a concern for their finances, and not providing so much of an inheritance that a feeling of entitlement or loss of self-purpose develops.  Warren Buffet said it best when he noted that he wanted to leave enough money for his heirs so they can do anything, but not so much money that they can do nothing.

A Wall Street Journal article on the subject gave several suggestions on how to speak with kids about generational wealth.  A favorite was the example of a pre-teen son who approached his mother and asked, “Are we rich?”  The mother replied, “Your father and I are. But you are not.”

A holistic approach to wealth management can go beyond asset allocation and financial planning.  Make sure you participate in the educating of children around family wealth.

Attitudes Towards Risk and Their Impact on Children

Sue BerginSue Bergin

An investor who is unaccepting of some investment risk limits potential opportunities for significant growth in their portfolio.  Even so, many such investors are satisfied as long as they remain in the black.  An argument of lost opportunity costs falls on deaf ears.  When you, as their advisor, point out that they are limiting their future growth potential, they are ok with it.  But, what if they thought that their risk aversion might have negative consequences for their children.  Might they look differently at their attitudes towards uncertain investments?

shutterstock_59441101A recent U.K. study shows that children of risk-averse parents scored lower on standardized tests.  They were also 1.34% percent less likely to go to college than children of parents who are more accepting of risk. [1]

According to the researchers, risk-averse people by their very nature may be unwilling to make inherently uncertain investments.  For example, they may be not be inclined to fund a private school education because they cannot be assured (guaranteed!) that it will result in greater successes for that child. Put another way, aversion to risk makes a person less likely to invest in their child’s human capital.

The researchers hint at another possible explanation for the phenomenon. They suggest that attitude towards risk reflects cognitive abilities.

For those of us who work with some incredibly bright, risk-averse clients, the first explanation seems more plausible.


[1]Parental Risk Attitudes and Children’s Academic Test Scores:  Evidence from the US Panel Study of Income Dynamics. http://links.mkt3142.com/ctt?kn=34&ms=NTIxMjM4MAS2&r=MTgxMDg2Njg2MjgS1&b=0&j=NTk5OTYzNTMS1&mt=1&rt=0

Your Parents’ and Children’s Annoying Communication Habits Can Help Improve Client Relationships by Sue Bergin

Do you have someone in your life that has a cell phone, but refuses to turn it on? For me, it’s my parents. It doesn’t matter if my 76-year-old father is riding his Harley Davidson through the Blue Ridge Mountains and no one has heard from him in three days. We just have to sit tight until he gets sick of camping and checks into a hotel. Then, he’ll call us. We can tell him to keep his phone on until we are blue in the face. We can buy him an unlimited calling plan for his next birthday. It isn’t going to make a difference. The phone is for emergencies only. As long as he is ok, it stays off.

Have you ever threatened to take away your daughter’s cell phone because they won’t pick up your calls? You don’t understand why she doesn’t take your calls when she knows it’s you, and she knows you want to reach her. She doesn’t understand why you have to talk to her when you can just send a text. She probably doesn’t want her friends to know she must actually talk to her parents. She definitely doesn’t want her friends to hear how she talks to her parents. She would much rather you text her. That way she can whine in private. On the contrary, you’d prefer to hear her voice so that you can better gauge the situation.

With varying degrees of aggravation, we have learned to conform to communication preferences in our personal relationships.

When it comes to your relationships with clients, however, you want to avoid communication frustration. Recognize that clients have their pet tools, and demonstrate a willingness to communicate with them according to their preferences, not yours.

Ask clients how they want their appointments confirmed. Do they want a text, e-mail or a phone call? Would they rather your newsletters and routine correspondence come in the mail to their home or office, or would they rather have them e-mailed. Would they prefer Skype sessions to face-to-face meetings? What is the best number to reach them? Are they among the 33% of American’s that have chucked their landlines in favor of cell phone service?

Keep in mind, communication frustration is a two way street. A client you’ve worked with for years could now be tossing out your newsletters, when he or she used to pour over them. It isn’t because they no longer value your insights, but rather they read their “news” online. You won’t know this until you ask about their preferences. Maybe it is during the intake process, or the annual review, or even a midsummer survey. The key is to get ahead of the issue before it becomes an issue.

Using your clients’ favored communication methods is as much of an offensive play as a defensive play. You become more efficient and eliminate some frustration in your day. You also ensure that you never unwittingly earn the label, “that annoying caller/texter/e-mailer/snail-mailer/Skyper/or Facebook messenger.”

http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/business-brains/one-third-of-us-households-chuck-landlines-now-use-mobile-only/20746