Monthly Market and Economic Outlook: May 2014

Amy MagnottaAmy Magnotta, CFASenior Investment Manager, Brinker Capital

The severe rotation that began in the U.S. equity markets in early March continued throughout April. Investors favored dividend-paying stocks and those with lower valuations at the expense of those trading at higher valuations. Large caps significantly outpaced small caps (+0.5% vs. -3.9%) and value led growth. From a sector perspective, energy (+5.2%), utilities (+4.3%) and consumer staples (+2.9%) led while financials (-1.5%), consumer discretionary (-1.4%) and healthcare (-0.5%) all lagged. Real assets, such as commodities and REITs, also continued to post gains.

International equity markets finished ahead of U.S. equity markets in April, eliminating the performance differential for the year-to-date period. In developed international markets, Japan continues to struggle, while European equities are performing well, helped by an improving economy. After a strong March, emerging markets were relatively flat in April. There has been significant dispersion in the performance of emerging economies so far this year; this variation in performance and fundamentals argues for active management in the asset class. Valuations in emerging markets have become attractive relative to developed markets.

Fixed income notched another month of decent gains in April as Treasury yields fell shutterstock_105096245_stockmarketchartslightly. At 2.6%, 10-year Treasury note yields remain 40 basis points below where they started the year and only 60 basis points higher than when the Fed began discussing tapering a year ago. All fixed income sectors were in positive territory for the month, led again by credit. Both investment grade and high yield credit spreads continue to grind tighter. Within the U.S. credit sector fundamentals are solid and the supply/demand dynamic is favorable, but valuations are elevated, especially in the investment grade space. We favor an actively managed best ideas strategy in high yield today, rather than broad market exposure. Municipal bonds have outpaced the broad fixed income market, helped by improving fundamentals and a positive technical backdrop.

While we believe that the long term bias is for interest rates to move higher, the move will be protracted. Sluggish economic growth, low inflation and geopolitical risks are keeping a lid on rates for the short-term. Despite our view on rates, fixed income still plays an important role in portfolios, as protection against equity market volatility. Our fixed income positioning in portfolios – which includes an emphasis on yield advantaged, shorter duration and low volatility absolute return strategies – is  designed to successfully navigate a rising or stable interest rate environment.

We approach our macro view as a balance between headwinds and tailwinds. We believe the scale remains tipped in favor of tailwinds as we move through the second quarter, with a number of factors supporting the economy and markets over the intermediate term.

  • Global monetary policy remains accommodative: Even with the Fed tapering asset purchases, short-term interest rates should remain near-zero until 2015 if inflation remains low. In addition, the ECB stands ready to provide support if necessary, and the Bank of Japan continues its aggressive monetary easing program.
  • Global growth stable: U.S. economic growth has been slow but steady. While the weather had a negative impact on growth in the first quarter, we expect growth to pick up in the second quarter. Outside of the U.S., growth has not been very robust, but it is still positive.
  • Labor market progress: The recovery in the labor market has been slow, but we have continued to add jobs. The unemployment rate has fallen to 6.3%.
  • Inflation tame: With the CPI increasing just +1.5% over the last 12 months and core CPI running at +1.7%, inflation is below the Fed’s 2% target. Inflation expectations have also been contained, providing the Fed flexibility to remain accommodative.
  • U.S. companies remain in solid shape: U.S. companies have solid balance sheets that are flush with cash that could be reinvested, used for acquisitions, or returned to shareholders. Deal activity has picked up this year. Corporate profits remain at high levels and margins have been resilient.
  • Less Drag from Washington: After serving as a major uncertainty over the last few years, there has been some movement in Washington. Fiscal drag will not have a major impact on growth this year. Congress agreed to both a budget and the extension of the debt ceiling. The deficit has also shown improvement in the short-term.
  • Equity fund flows turned positive: Continued inflows would provide further support to the equity markets.

However, risks facing the economy and markets remain, including:

  • Fed Tapering/Tightening: If the Fed continues at the current pace, quantitative easing should end in the fourth quarter. Risk assets have historically reacted negatively when monetary stimulus has been withdrawn; however, this withdrawal is more gradual and the economy appears to be on more solid footing this time. The new Fed chairperson also adds to the uncertainty. Should economic growth and inflation pick up, market participants will shift quickly to concern over the timing of the Fed’s first interest rate hike.
  • Emerging Markets: Slower growth and capital outflows could continue to weigh on emerging markets. While growth in China is slowing, there is not yet evidence of a hard landing.
  • Election Year: While we noted there has been some progress in Washington, market volatility could pick up in the summer should the rhetoric heat up in Washington in preparation for the mid-term elections.
  • Geopolitical Risks: The events surrounding Russia and Ukraine are further evidence that geopolitical risks cannot be ignored.

Risk assets should continue to perform if real growth continues to recover; however, we could see volatility as markets digest the continued withdrawal of stimulus by the Federal Reserve. Economic data will be watched closely for signs that could lead to tighter monetary policy earlier than expected. Equity market valuations are fair, but are not overly rich relative to history, and may even be reasonable when considering the level of interest rates and inflation. Credit conditions still provide a positive backdrop for the markets.

Our portfolios are positioned to take advantage of continued strength in risk assets, and we continue to emphasize high conviction opportunities within asset classes, as well as strategies that can exploit market inefficiencies.

Source:  Brinker Capital

Source: Brinker Capital

Data points above compiled from FactSet, Standard & Poor’s, MSCI, and Barclays. The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are for informational purposes only. Holdings subject to change.

Economic Headwinds and Tailwinds

Magnotta @AmyMagnotta, CFA, Brinker Capital

We continue to approach our macro view as a balance between headwinds and tailwinds. The scale tipped slightly in favor of tailwinds to start the year as we saw a slight pickup in the U.S. economy, some resolution on fiscal policy, and even more accommodative monetary policy globally. However, we continue to face global macro risks, especially in Europe, which could result in bouts of market volatility. The strong market move in the first quarter, combined with higher levels of sentiment, and a potentially disappointing earnings season, may leave us susceptible to a pull-back in the near term, but our longer-term view remains constructive. While the second quarter may bring weaker growth in the U.S., consensus is for economic activity to pick up in the second half of the year.

Tailwinds
Accommodative monetary policy: The Fed continues with their Quantitative Easing Program and will keep short-term rates on hold until they see a sustained pickup in employment. The European Central Bank has also pledged support to defend the Euro and has committed to sovereign bond purchases of countries who apply for aid. Now the Bank of Japan is embracing an aggressive monetary easing program in an attempt to boost growth and inflation. The markets remain awash in liquidity.

U.S. companies remain in solid shape: U.S. companies have solid balance sheets that are flush with cash that could be put to work through M&A, capital expenditures or hiring, or returned to shareholders in the form of  dividends or share buybacks. While estimates are coming down, profits are still at high levels.

Housing market improvement: The housing market is showing signs of improvement. Home prices are  increasing, helped by tight supply. The S&P/Case-Shiller 20-City Home Price Index gained +8.1% for the 12-month period ending January 2013. Sales activity is picking up and affordability remains at high levels. An improvement in housing, typically a consumer’s largest asset, is a boost to confidence.

Equity Fund Flows Turn Positive:  After experiencing years of significant outflows, investors have begun to reallocate to equity mutual funds. Investors have added over $67 billion to equity funds so far in 2013 (ICI, as of  3/27/13), compared to outflows of $153 billion in 2012. Investors continue to add money to fixed income funds as
well ($70 billion so far this year).
shutterstock_112080815
Headwinds

European sovereign debt crisis and recession: The promise of bond purchases by the ECB has driven down borrowing costs for problem countries and bought policymakers time, but it cannot solve the underlying  problems in Europe. Austerity measures are serving only to weaken growth further and cause higher unemployment and social unrest. After how it dealt with Cyprus, there is again risk of policy error in Europe.  We are also closely watching the Italian elections in June after February’s elections were inconclusive.

U.S. policy uncertainty continues: After passing the fiscal cliff compromise to start the year, Washington passed a short-term extension of the debt ceiling and more recently agreed on a continuing resolution to avoid a government shutdown. The sequester, which was temporarily delayed as part of the fiscal cliff deal, went into effect on March 1. The automatic spending cuts have not yet been felt by most, but it will soon start to show  up in the second quarter and will shave an estimated 0.5% from GDP. In addition, the debt ceiling will need to be addressed again this summer.

Geopolitical Risks:
Recent events in North Korea are cause for concern.

This commentary is intended to provide opinions and analysis of the market and economy, but is not intended to provide personalized  investment advice. Statements referring to future actions or events, such as the future financial performance of certain asset classes, market segments, economic trends, or the market as a whole are based on the current expectations and projections about future events provided by various sources, including Brinker Capital’s Investment Management Group. These statements are not guarantees of future performance, and actual events may differ materially from those discussed. Diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss in a declining market, including possible loss of principal. This commentary includes information obtained from third-party sources. Brinker Capital believes those sources to be accurate and reliable; however, we are not responsible for errors by third-party sources on which we reasonably rely.

Economic Headwinds and Tailwinds

We continue to approach our macro view as a balance between cyclical tailwinds and more structural headwinds. While we have seen some improvement in the economy and strong global equity markets, helped by easy monetary policy, we continue to face global macro risks and uncertainties. The unresolved risks could result in bouts of market volatility. As a result, portfolios have a modest defensive bias, and are focused on high conviction opportunities within asset classes.

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turbines

The Implications Of The 2012 Presidential Election

This Tuesday marked the end of the 2012 Presidential Election campaign, with Barack Obama heading back to the White House.  In a campaign marked by elements of vitriol and an astronomical amount of money spent, most experts ballpark it around $6 billion in total, the results were status quo.   Republicans maintained their majority in the House, while the Democrats, after picking up a few surprise seats, remain in control of the Senate and Presidency.

As the new(ish) regime begins to game-plan for the next four years, a number of issues to address lay in wait.  The first, and potentially most significant, is the fiscal cliff the government must face before January 1, 2013.  With the Bush-era tax cuts expiring in conjunction with spending cuts, the U.S. economy will see about a 4% drag on GDP, forcing policymakers to address the looming recession.  The most likely scenario is an extension of most of the provisions already in place, which would result in a drag on GDP closer to 1%.

A key proponent in all of this is a compromise of tax increases on high-income earners—a significant area of compromise for President Obama. It would seem that the majority of investors are anticipating such a short-term deal to take place, but if no deal is signed before the end of the year, the market will react to the disappointment.

Next on tap for the President is a defined, long-term fiscal package. And while it will be a difficult task with a split government, it has been done before.  It is important for investors to have a roadmap to address our fiscal issues as it would reduce uncertainties, provide businesses and consumers with a higher level of confidence, and ultimately spend and contribute to positive growth. One strong point here is our high demand for U.S. Treasuries, even at current low rates.

With possible changes facing the Federal Reserve and tax increases, we are faced with a number of uncertainties.  We’ve crossed the election off our list of concerns and now turn our heads to the fiscal cliff. So as we head into year end, we will prepare for market volatility while keeping a close eye on what Congress is planning.

Becoming an Obvious Expert Beverly D. Flaxington for Brinker Capital

One of the best ways for financial advisors to generate new business is to become “known”. Known as the expert, as the advisor with insights, and as the person who has something important to say. Many investors like to work with someone they perceive as knowledgeable and well-rounded.
How best to become an obvious expert? The first important piece is to be seen and heard. This can be done through using a PR (public relations) strategy and through social media. PR includes things like being interviewed on radio and television, being written about in newspapers and periodicals, and issuing press releases or other news stories. Social media includes things like LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook, and means engaging in online discussion and information boards to talk about your expertise.
Some advisors shy away from the media because they don’t know what to say. As a first step, think about what interesting angles you can address relative to important topics in the news. Don’t limit your thinking to just the stock and bond market movements; think about trends for retirees and/or divorcees, multi-generational issues, or any other newsworthy trend that can connect back to your process or philosophy with regard to investing or planning.
Consider some of the following to establish your credibility as the obvious expert:
(1) Radio and television interviews are “free” advertising. Read and watch different journalists and reporters. Find out what they often report on. Write an email or a note to respond to some information they’ve given and your angle on their story. Make friends with your local media. Reporters and journalists are looking for new, fresh angles all the time.
(2) If you want to put more effort into it, consider doing your own blog talk radio show. You can pay a nominal fee to get set up on one of the major networks such as Live365 or blogtalkradio. With your own show you are responsible for coming up with content for each program, but you can always leverage other relationships such as COIs (Centers of Influence) like realtors, attorneys or accountants. Having your own show means you would be the interviewer instead of the interviewee. However, it allows you to get your thoughts and ideas across to an audience each week or month, depending on the show schedule.
(3) Create audio or video recordings of any interviews you have, or just record yourself telling case stories about how you work with clients. Circulate the audio or video to the press and also post it on your website.
(4) Issue a press release about something interesting happening at your firm. This could be the launch of a new website, a new angle on your service offerings, or a new hire to your firm. Anything happening at your firm can be newsworthy. Send press releases out over many of the free services available, such as this or this
(5) Engage in social media. As you pursue relationships with the younger generation (i.e. anyone under 40 years of age), they will immediately search you out on Google or some other engine to find whatever they can about you. It’s imperative to have a presence of some kind. Have an updated LinkedIn account, follow people on Twitter or create an account, if your compliance department allows it. Have a blog if you can, or at minimum post to other’s blogs when you have a response or idea to share.
Put a focus on becoming known, being seen and staying out in the public eye.

There are many opportunities to do so. Consider the ones that are right for your practice.

Central Bank’s Sway Stock, Market Commentary by Joe Preisser

Aided by a broad based reassessment of comments issued by European Central Bank President, Mario Draghi on Thursday, and the release of better than anticipated employment figures for the month of July in the United States, stocks rallied strongly on Friday to reverse the losses suffered earlier in the week and reclaim their upward trajectory.

Following a meeting of the American Central Bank’s policy making committee this week, the decision to forbear enacting any additionally accommodative monetary policy at present was announced in tandem with indications that measures designed to stimulate the world’s largest economy may be forthcoming.  The Federal Open Market Committee said in its official statement that they, “will provide additional accommodation as needed to promote a stronger economic recovery and sustained improvement in labor market conditions.”  As the recovery in the world’s largest economy has continued at a frustratingly slow pace, hope has pervaded the marketplace that increased liquidity will be provided by policy makers in order to encourage growth should they deem it necessary.  In its most recent communiqué, the Federal Reserve has reinforced this belief thus offering support for risk based assets.  Brian Jacobsen, the Chief Portfolio Strategist for Wells Fargo Funds Management was quoted in the Wall Street Journal as saying, “They probably are closer to providing, as they say, ‘additional accommodation as needed’, but I still think that they want more data before they actually pull the trigger.”

Investors across the globe registered their disappointment on Thursday with the decision rendered by the European Central Bank, to refrain from immediately employing any additional measures to support the Eurozone’s economy, by selling shares of companies listed around the world.  Hope for the announcement of the commencement of an aggressive sovereign bond buying program, designed to lower borrowing costs for the heavily indebted members of the currency union, which blossomed in the wake of comments made by Central Bank President Mario Draghi last week were temporarily dashed during Thursday’s press conference.  Although Mr. Draghi pledged to defend the euro, and stated that the common currency is, “irreversible” (New York Times), the absence of a substantive plan to aid the ailing nations of the monetary union was disparaged by the marketplace and precipitated a steep decline in international indices.

Friday morning brought with it a large scale reinterpretation of the message conveyed by European Central Bank President, Mario Draghi the day before, as investors parsed the meaning of his words and concluded that the E.C.B. is in fact moving closer to employing the debt purchasing program the market has been clamoring for.  The release of better than expected news from the labor market in the United States combined with the improvement in sentiment on the Continent to send shares markedly higher across the globe.  According to the New York Times, “on Friday, stocks on Wall Street and in Europe advanced as investors digested the announcement alongside data showing the U.S. added 163,000 jobs.”  Although the absence of immediate action served to initially unnerve traders, further reflection upon the President’s comments revealed the resolve of the Central Bank to support the currency union and fostered optimism for its maintenance. A statement released by French bank Credit Agricole on Friday captured the marked change in market sentiment, “Mr. Draghi’s strong words should not be understated, in our view.  The ECB President made it perfectly clear that the governing council was ready to address rising sovereign yields…Overall, notwithstanding the lack of detail at this stage, we believe the ECB will deliver a bold policy response in due time”(Wall Street Journal).

Potential for ECB Action Incites Strong Rally by Joe Preisser

Emphatic declarations of support for the Continent’s common currency, issued by The President of the European Central Bank, Mario Draghi on Thursday, and echoed by German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Francoise Hollande on Friday served to bolster investor sentiment and ignited a strong rally across global equities. The display of solidarity in defense of the euro project from the Union’s leadership seen this week came in response to the reemergence of fears of its possible dissolution as funding costs for the Spanish government soared to dangerous heights.

Trading for the week commenced as speculation that Spain would be the next member of the currency union to require emergency funding, swept through the marketplace, putting downward pressure on share prices around the world.  A decision by Madrid to offer financial support to the country’s struggling regional governments caused concern that the additional obligations would create an unsustainable situation for the heavily indebted nation. The yield on Spanish 10 year bonds rose above the record height of 7.5% on Tuesday, while Spain’s IBEX-35 stock index sank nearly 10% over the course of three trading sessions, reflecting the depth of trepidation with which the credit and equities markets view the difficulties currently facing the government.  According to Bloomberg News, “After taking on as much as 100 billion euros of bailout loans to aid banks, the risk…is that the additional burden of helping regions pushes bond yields to unaffordable levels.”

As the nations of the European Union continue to struggle to address the soaring borrowing costs faced by several of their member states, the trepidation this has created among investors around the globe revealed itself in several of the quarterly earnings releases issued this week.  The current situation on the Continent has deeply affected markets in the eurozone, reverberated across Asia, and is now being reflected in the profitability of corporations in the United States highlighting the global implications of the current crisis.  United Parcel Service, which delivers more packages than any company in the world, and Whirlpool Corp., the globe’s largest manufacturer of appliances both saw their shares fall after reporting earnings which failed to meet expectations (Bloomberg News). In its earnings release statement, Scott Davis, the Chief Executive Officer of UPS said, “Increasing uncertainty in the United States, continuing weakness in Asia exports and the debt crisis in Europe are impacting projections of economic expansion.”  

In an effort to hold down borrowing costs and to thwart contagion, the President of the European Central Bank, Mario Draghi, stated on Thursday that steps would be taken to halt the precipitous rise in the sovereign yields of several of the most heavily indebted members of the currency union.  Mr. Draghi was quoted by Bloomberg News as saying, “within our mandate, the ECB is ready to do whatever it takes to preserve the euro.  And believe me, it will be enough.”  The marketplace found solace in this statement, as the prevalent feeling among investors currently is that a direct sovereign bond buying by the ECB will be forthcoming, thus easing a measure of the acute effects of the crisis. With unlimited capacity on its balance sheet, the Central Bank is widely considered to be the only institution on the Continent capable of successfully intervening in the debt market to drive funding costs lower.  Bloomberg News quoted Bernd Berg, a foreign-exchange strategist at Credit Suisse, “Draghi’s comments that the ECB would do everything to preserve the euro currency gave some relief to markets and lifted asset prices after renewed euro-zone collapse fears.”

A joint statement issued by German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Francoise Hollande that their nations are, “bound by the deepest duty”(Bloomberg News), to maintain the currency union in its current iteration served to further ease investor concerns, as it reinforced the commitment of the Continent’s two largest economies to the euro project.  With a multitude of challenges facing the global economy it will be vitally important that the leaders of the European Union follow through in short order on the pledges made this week and work to drive sovereign yields back to sustainable levels, thus restoring a measure of stability to the marketplace.

Tough Negotiators See Red By Sue Bergin

Want to best position yourself next time you are negotiating fees, haggling with the broker dealer on issuance requirements, or trying to get your client the best rate on a mortgage?  Put a quick PowerPoint slide together with your key points and put it on a blue background.  
 
Or grey.  
 
Anything but red.
 
Researchers from Virginia Tech and the University of Virginia recently released a study describing how colors affect consumers’ willingness to pay in purchase settings like auctions and negotiations. They found that the color red influences how much participants were willing to pay in competitive situations.
 
The color red has long been known to invoke feelings of aggression.  Red is an emotionally intense color that enhances metabolism, increases respiration rate, and raises blood pressure.  It is also one of the easiest colors to see, which explains why stop signs, stoplights, and fire equipment are usually painted red.
 
Study participants who “saw red” entered higher bid jumps in auctions and made lower offers in negotiation settings.  In both cases, they took a competitive stance.  In bidding situations, they were willing to increase bids to ensure that they “won” the item and were not outbid.
 
In negotiation settings, participants who gained their information on a red background also wanted to “win.”  Their initial offers were low.  For example, when participants were shown vacation packages that were displayed on a blue background and were asked to make their best offer, the average was $712.  The same package set against a red background yielded an average offer of $684.  
 
The researchers concluded that the red background induced greater aggression, which caused participants to implicitly compete against the seller for the best deal.
 
Advisors typically avoid showing their clients anything that includes the color red.  This study gives us one more reason to love blue.

Newspaper Lampshades, Designer Cartoon Strip Handbags and the Savvy Advisor by Sue Bergin

Newspaper Lampshades, Designer Cartoon Strip Handbags and the Savvy Advisor
by Sue Bergin

Why is it that old letters from a strangers’ estate sale made into wallpaper is suddenly the “in thing” in interior design? Why would anyone in her right mind walk around in a dress that is made to look like yesterday’s newspaper? Are people really turning old, used books into cell phone docking stations? And, Dooney & Bourque’s comic strip handbags? What’s up with those?

These are all examples of what marketing and communication firm JWT calls “Objectifying Objects,” when it describes one of the top 10 trends for 2012.

According to JWT, as objects are replaced by digital and virtual counterparts, people will be drawn to the physical and tactile facsimiles.

Savvy marketers are catching on to the fact that digital messages are getting lost in the atmosphere and that “objects,” like good old fashion snail-mail, may have greater impact.

According to JWT, marketers spent nearly 25% less on direct mail campaigns in the years from 2007 to 2009. In 2010-2011, the pendulum swung. Digital mail began to see single digit gains. In further proof, JWT sites that the U.S. Postal Service projects marketing mail will rise 14% by the year 2016.

The bottom line is this. A single scrawled note on handsome stationery could make an even greater impression than a steady stream of tweets. This could explain why, despite the paperless wave and skyrocketing mobile and tablet sales, U.K. retailer John Lewis reported a 79% year-over-year increase in writing paper sales in mid-2011.

The allure of the handwritten note is best summed up by the best-selling author, Neil Pasricha, in his wildly popular bog, 1,000 Awesome Things:
“(T)he biggest reason why getting something handwritten is great is because it’s just so darned rare. I mean, for most people, you’re more likely to see Halley’s Comet crash into Big Foot while he’s riding the Loch Ness Monster than to actually get a full-blown note from a friend.
So I say treasure those handwritten notes, when you get ‘em, if you get ‘em. And if you don’t, there’s a pretty easy way to start receiving them. Man, just send a couple.”

1. http://www.jwtintelligence.com/2012/07/snail-mail-renaissance-write-home/

2. http://1000awesomethings.com/2008/11/14/895-getting-something-with-actual-handwriting-on-it-in-the-mail/

Understanding Behavioral Style in Developing New Business – Part 2 by Bev Flaxington

In Part 1 of this two-part blog on behavioral selling, we discussed how behavior style impacts communication and why it is crucial for the successful advisor, business development representative or client services person to understand this science. Now, in Part 2, we give some sales examples.

If an advisor learns how to identify her or his own behavioral style, and learns all the nuances around it, he or she can learn the styles of buyers and influencers. Then, he or she can adapt their behavioral style to increase the probability of true connection with prospects and for developing long-term relationships – even with people very different from themselves. For business development people, this leads to an increased ability to close more business with new and existing prospects and clients. For client service folks, this means the ability to manage a long-term relationship even when there’s no real “click” of personalities.

In Part 1 we described the four styles – D for Dominance, I for Influencing, S for Steadiness and C for Compliance. Everyone has a “core” style, e.g. one dominant style out of these four; having determined that your prospect or client prominently displays the characteristics of one, your objective is to communicate with him or her accordingly. Here are some characteristics of each and how you’d approach them.

“D” – Interested in new & unique services or products; very “results” focused; makes quick decisions
“I” – Interested in showy and flashy products; focused on the “experience” (is it, or does it allow for, fun!); makes quick decisions
“S” – Interested in traditional products; very trusting and is looking for trust; is slow in decision making
“C” – Interested in proven, time-tested products; needs and seeks information; is very slow in decision making

As an example of communicating based on this knowledge, we’ll take the “I”. We’ll call this client Mr. Jones. He, like other core “I”s, is effusive and upbeat – an extrovert. They have a high need to verbalize ideas and their key emotion is optimism. Their expectations of others are high and their conflict response is to run away. Their stress reliever is interaction and socializing with people. Descriptors for them include inspiring, persuasive and trusting.

To further help you determine what core style you’re dealing with, there are four communication factors that are giveaways for each of the four styles. These factors are 1) Tone of Voice, 2) Pace of Speech and Action, 3) Words Used and 4) Body Language. In our example, how can you tell you’re interacting with a core “I”? Key on the communication factors for instant clues:
• Tone of Voice – it will be energized, enthusiastic, friendly and colorful
• Pace of Speech and Action – s/he will exhibit fast speech and fast action, and be fast toward people
• Words Used – fun, excitement, immediate, now, today, new and unique
• Body Language – you’ll feel the fast pace, the fast movement and orientation toward people.

Now that you’ve identified Mr. Jones as a high “I”, you must calibrate your own natural style for communicating with him. So if you are, say, a high “C” – as many advisors are – you need to make sure that you pick up your pace a bit, smile and nod your head to show that you’re fully engaged with the high “I,” keep the focus on them and ask questions, respond to their small talk and give them as much time as possible to verbalize. For a core “C” (or “S”) advisor, this can be exhausting – but you can relax after the meeting, which will be more successful if you adapt!

By taking the time to listen, observe and ask good questions, advisors can discern the behavior style of prospects and clients – and open whole new relational opportunities in the process. Next time, we’ll discuss some of the questions you can ask to help you determine style.