Earnings Season Upon Us, but Information Void Looms

Raupp_Podcast_GraphicJeff Raupp, CFA, Senior Investment Manager

On this week’s podcast (recorded August 1, 2016), Jeff covers the current themes impacting markets, including Brexit, earnings season, and the presidential election. Highlights of his discussion include:

  • Since the initial negative reaction from the Brexit vote in late June, markets have rebounded sharply, with U.S. stocks up over 15% since the June 27 lows and international stocks up over 10%.
  • Late summer and fall loom as somewhat of an information void, where economic data is a little sparser and investors have a harder time seeing the impetus for the next leg up in the market.
  • It wouldn’t be surprising to see a pause in the upward momentum in the markets until we get more clarity about the direction of the election.
  • This past week, housing, earnings, employment and wages all had positive reports, but were offset by a very disappointing GDP number.

For Jeff’s full insight, click here to listen to the audio recording.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

Investment Insights Podcast – Hope Springs Eternal

miller_podcast_graphicBill Miller, Chief Investment Officer

On this week’s podcast (recorded February 11, 2016), Bill addresses the current market climate and why there is reason to remain hopeful:

What we don’t like: Stocks are down around 10% in general; European stock markets are down even more; Asian markets down the most; it’s a tough environment for investors

What we like: We don’t believe this is a long-term bear market and don’t see a recession hitting the U.S.; labor and wages are positive; auto and housing is good as well; economy seems sturdy despite volatile market behavior; China poised to finalize five-year plan including lowering corporate tax rates and addressing government debt levels; ECB should start to show more support for its major banks

What we’re doing about it: Most of the damage is done; more sensible to see what we should buy or rotate into; hedged pretty fully in tactical products; staying the course in more strategic products

Click here to listen to the audio recording

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

Investment Insights Podcast – September 18, 2015

miller_podcast_graphicBill Miller, Chief Investment Officer

On this week’s podcast (recorded September 18, 2015):

What we like: Janet Yellen announced no hike to interest rates; investors had been tracking her policy decision for weeks, making it a distraction, but now some of that stress is alleviated; Yellen was decisive and clear that they wouldn’t raise rates near-term and when they do, there will be fair warning; investors can now focus on the global economy as opposed to that and Fed policy

What we don’t like: As we shift focus to the economy, economic data is currently mixed; employment, housing, and auto are good, manufacturing and production not as much; China, Europe, and Japan have patchwork economic data as well–some good, some bad.

What we’re doing about it: Focusing on growth for investors; watching for earnings reports in early October; leaning more bullish

Click here to listen to the audio recording

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change.

In the Conversation: No Surprises Here

Tom WilsonTom Wilson, Managing Director, Wealth Advisory &
Senior Investment Manager

After completing their two days of meetings, The Federal Reserve decided to leave the Federal Funds Rate unchanged. As noted in yesterday’s blog, this was the consensus opinion of what would take place today.

The Fed noted that general business conditions had improved since their last meeting in July. They specifically noted the continued improvement in the labor markets, strength in the housing sector, and modest improvement in consumer and business spending. On the negative side, they stated that export growth has been soft and that inflation continued to run below the committee’s longer-term target. In addition, Fed chair Janet Yellen commented that weakening global growth had also contributed to today’s low level of inflation.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change.

Investment Insights Podcast – Back to School

miller_podcast_graphicBill Miller, Chief Investment Officer

On this week’s podcast, Bill gets in back-to-school mode and reflects on the summer events that impacted the markets and economy (recorded September 8, 2015):

Highlights include:

  • Both China’s growth slowing down and the Fed considering raising interest rates dominated summer headlines
  • Deutsche Bank feels that markets could be up between now and the end of the year regardless of interest rate hikes; upside outweighing the downside
  • Also feel that a rate increase by Fed will likely not harm the economy (employment, housing, and auto all strong)
  • China not dumping U.S. Treasuries so they don’t appear desperate at this time

Click here to listen to the audio recording

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change.

Investment Insights Podcast – August 14, 2015

miller_podcast_graphicBill Miller, Chief Investment Officer

On this week’s podcast (recorded August 13, 2015):

What we don’t like: Oil prices are making new lows; the Federal Reserve is expected to raise interest rates in September; China economy continues to slow and there is an overall mix of economic news

What we like: Labor and wages; housing and automotive industries are strong; back to school season is around the corner; hopeful that we’re not too far from better economic news

What we’re doing about it: No change in our strategic products; more defensive in our tactical products and will remain that way going into the Federal Reserve’s interest rate policy in September

Click here to listen to the audio recording

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change.

 

Monthly Market and Economic Outlook: December 2014

Amy MagnottaAmy Magnotta, CFASenior Investment Manager, Brinker Capital

Global equity markets were positive in November, helped by optimism over the prospect of additional monetary policy easing in Japan and Europe. U.S. equity markets posted another solid monthly gain, led by large and mid cap growth companies. The energy sector was down more than -8% due to the collapse in oil prices after OPEC decided not to cut output. However, the expectation of higher disposable incomes as a result of lower gasoline prices helped push the consumer sectors higher in November.

International equities lagged U.S. equity markets again in November. The S&P 500 Index has gained almost 14% year to date through November, while the MSCI All Country World ex USA Index is flat. The U.S. dollar, which has gained over 10% so far this year, has also been a contributor. Developed market equities fared better than emerging markets in November. European equities reacted positively to the expectation that the ECB would soon announce a full scale quantitative easing program. Within emerging markets, equity market gains in China and India were offset by weak performance in Brazil and Russia.

outlook_chartDespite stronger economic data, longer-term U.S. Treasury yields continue to move lower, while rates on the shorter end of the curve were unchanged to slightly higher, resulting in a flattening yield curve. From the beginning of November through December 12, the yield on the 10-year note fell 25 basis points to 2.10% and the yield on the 30-year bond fell 32 basis points to 2.75%. The yield on the 2-year note rose 6 basis points over that same period. The Barclays Aggregate Index was up +0.7% for the month, led by government bonds.

The negative sentiment surrounding the energy sector has weighed significantly on the high yield asset class. Energy represents 13% of the Barclays High Yield Index, up from 6% of the index in 2008. The credit issues outside of the energy sector have been limited, and should the economy continue to grow, current spread levels (525 basis points above Treasuries which we last saw in December 2012) look more attractive.

Our macro outlook has not changed. When weighing the positives and the risks, we continue to believe the balance is shifted even more in favor of the positives over the intermediate-term and the global macro backdrop is constructive for risk assets. As a result our strategic portfolios are positioned with an overweight to overall risk. A number of factors should support the economy and markets over the intermediate term.

  • Global monetary policy remains accommodative: Even with QE complete Fed policy is still accommodative. U.S. short-term interest rates should remain near-zero until mid-2015 if inflation remains contained. The ECB stands ready to take even more aggressive action to support the European economy, and the Bank of Japan expanded its already aggressive easing program.
  • Pickup in U.S. growth: Economic growth in the U.S. has picked up. Companies are starting to spend on hiring and capital expenditures. Both manufacturing and service PMIs remain in expansion territory. Housing has been weaker, but consumer and CEO confidence are elevated.
  • U.S. companies remain in solid shape: U.S. companies have solid balance sheets that are with cash. M&A deal activity has picked up this year. Earnings growth has been ahead of expectations and margins have been resilient.
  • Less uncertainty in Washington: After serving as a major uncertainty over the last few years, Washington has done little damage so far this year. Fiscal drag will not have a major impact on growth this year, and the budget deficit has also declined significantly. Government spending will again become a contributor to GDP growth in 2015.

Risks facing the economy and markets remain, including:

  • Timing of Fed tightening: QE ended without a major impact, so concern has shifted to the timing of the Fed’s first interest rate hike. While economic growth has picked up and the labor market has shown steady improvement, inflation measures and inflation expectations remain contained.
  • Global growth: While growth in the U.S. has picked up more recently, growth outside the U.S. is decidedly weaker. Both the OECD and IMF have downgraded their forecasts for global growth.
  • Geopolitical risks: The geopolitical impact of the significant drop in oil prices, as well as issues in the Middle East and Ukraine, could cause short-term volatility.

Despite levels of investor sentiment that have moved back towards optimism territory and valuations that are close to long-term averages, we remain positive on equities for the reasons previously stated. In addition, seasonality and the election cycle are in our favor. The fourth quarter tends to be bullish for equities, as well as the 12-month period following mid-term elections.

outlook_12.18.174

Our portfolios are positioned to take advantage of continued strength in risk assets, and we continue to emphasize high conviction opportunities within asset classes, as well as strategies that can exploit market inefficiencies.

 

Monthly Market and Economic Outlook: November 2014

Amy MagnottaAmy Magnotta, CFASenior Investment Manager, Brinker Capital

After a pullback that began in mid-September, the equity markets bounced back sharply in the last two weeks of October. The equity markets shrugged off the end of the Fed’s quantitative easing program and slower economic growth outside of the U.S., viewing the weakness as a buying opportunity. After being down -7% during the correction, the S&P 500 ended the month at a new high. Utilities and healthcare were the top performing sectors, while energy and materials were negative on the month. Small caps bounced back even harder than large caps with the Russell 2000 gaining +6.6% in October, yet small caps have not yet eclipsed their July highs. Year to date through October, mid cap value has been the best performing style, gaining +11.9% due to the strong performance of REITs and utilities.

International equity markets were mixed in October. Developed markets, including Europe and Japan, were generally negative, while emerging markets ended the month in positive territory, led by strong performance in India and China. The U.S. exhibited further strength versus both developed and emerging market currencies. International equity markets have significantly lagged the U.S. markets so far this year; the spread between the S&P 500 Index and MSCI ACWI ex USA Index is 1200 basis points through October.

During the equity market sell-off U.S. Treasury yields declined. The yield on the 10-year note fell almost 50 basis points to a low of 2.14% on October 15, then moved slightly higher to end the month at 2.35%. It was a good month for the fixed income asset class, with all sectors posting positive returns led by corporate credit. High-yield credit spreads widened out 100 basis points in the equity market sell-off, but recaptured 75% of that move in the last two weeks of October. High-yield spreads still remain 100 basis points wider than the low reached in June, and the fundamental backdrop is positive. Municipal bonds had another solid month, benefiting from a continued supply/demand imbalance and improving credit fundamentals.

Our macro outlook has not changed. When weighing the positives and the risks, we continue to believe the balance is shifted even more in favor of the positives over the intermediate-term and the global macro backdrop is constructive for risk assets. As a result our strategic portfolios are positioned with an overweight to overall risk. A number of factors should support the economy and markets over the intermediate term.

  • Global monetary policy remains accommodative: Even with QE complete, Fed policy is still accommodative. U.S. short-term interest rates should remain near-zero until mid-2015 if inflation remains contained. The ECB stands ready to take even more aggressive action to support the European economy, and the Bank of Japan expanded its already aggressive easing program.
  • Pickup in U.S. growth: Economic growth in the U.S. has picked up. Companies are starting to spend on hiring and capital expenditures. Both manufacturing and service PMIs remain in expansion territory. Housing has been weaker, but consumer and CEO confidence are elevated.
  • U.S. companies remain in solid shape: U.S. companies have solid balance sheets that flush with cash. M&A deal activity has picked up this year. Earnings growth has been ahead of expectations and margins have been resilient.
  • Less uncertainty in Washington: After serving as a major uncertainty over the last few years, Washington has done little damage so far this year. Fiscal drag will not have a major impact on growth this year, and the budget deficit has also declined significantly. Government spending will again become a contributor to GDP growth in 2015.

Risks facing the economy and markets remain, including:

  • Fed’s withdrawal of stimulus: Risk assets have historically reacted negatively when monetary stimulus has been withdrawn; however, tapering was gradual and the economy is on more solid footing this time. Should inflation measures pick up, market participants will quickly shift to concern over the timing of the Fed’s first interest rate hike. However, the core Personal Consumption Expenditure Price (PCE) Index, the Fed’s preferred inflation measure, is up only +1.4% over the last 12 months and we have not yet seen the improvement in the labor market translate into a level of wage growth that is worrisome.
  • Global growth: While growth in the U.S. has picked up recently, concerns remain surrounding growth in continental Europe, Japan and some emerging markets. Both the OECD and IMF have downgraded their forecasts for global growth.
  • Geopolitical risks: The events in the Middle East and Ukraine, as well as Ebola fears could have a transitory impact on markets.

Despite levels of investor sentiment that have moved back towards optimism territory and valuations that are close to long-term averages, we remain positive on equities for the reasons previously stated. In addition, seasonality and the election cycle are in our favor. The fourth quarter tends to be bullish for equities, as well as the 12-month period following mid-term elections.

Our portfolios are positioned to take advantage of continued strength in risk assets, and we continue to emphasize high-conviction opportunities within asset classes, as well as strategies that can exploit market inefficiencies.

Asset Class Outlook Favored Sub-Asset Classes
U.S. Equity + Large caps growth
Intl Equity + Emerging and frontier markets, small cap
Fixed Income - Global high-yield credit
Absolute Return + Closed-end funds, global macro
Real Assets +/- Natural resources equities
Private Equity + Diversified

Source: Brinker Capital

Views expressed are for informational purposes only. Holdings subject to change. Not all asset classes referenced in this material may be represented in your portfolio. All investments involve risk including loss of principal. Fixed income investments are subject to interest rate and credit risk. Foreign securities involve additional risks, including foreign currency changes, political risks, foreign taxes, and different methods of accounting and financial reporting. Past performance is not a guarantee of similar future results. An investor cannot invest directly in an index.

 

Housing Recovery: Slow but Sustainable

Sheila BonitzSheila Bonitz, Vice President of Investment Management,
Brinker Capital

As we enter into the busiest selling season of the housing market (March – June), we are seeing signs of improvement within the housing industry as a whole. While many believe that the housing market is sustainable, it has not been a “V-shaped” recovery. Instead, it may be a long, slow road as the effects of the 2008 housing crisis are still fresh in everyone’s mind.

Positive signs for the housing industry:

U.S. Consumer Confidence

Source: FactSet

  • Mortgage delinquency rates are trending down, which is a positive for the economy.
  • Home prices are firming and increasing in some areas. The S&P/Case-Shiller Home Price Index increased +13% over the last 12 months.
  • Overall consumer confidence is increasing, and potential homebuyers are feeling better about buying a home.
  • Pent-up demand–we are well below the average of household formation since the 2008 crisis. Kids are living on the couch versus moving out.

What is different with this recovery?
Developers are much more strategic than what they were in 2006/2007. They are making purposeful, strategic decisions and are concentrating. Developers are focused on the A-market where the focus is on move-up buyers that are less sensitive to price and who have acceptable credit scores. Within the A-market, developers have flexibility with the price of the home. Slightly higher prices help to drive steady volume, which helps control inventory levels and provides steady work for the construction crews. The slightly higher home prices also give a lift to the developers’ operating margins.

Credit is still tight. The average FICO score for approved mortgage loans is 737, well above the 690 average we saw in the 2004-2007 period.

Potential homebuyers enter the housing market cautiously. With home prices on the rise again, they have concerns that their newly-purchased home value may fall sharply. 2008 clearly showed the world that there is no guarantee of generating a profit on the investment of a home. That being said, with interest rates at historic lows and with the cost of buying more advantageous than renting, we will see more people tiptoe their way back into the housing market.

Things to watch:

Mortgage Delinquency Rates

Source: FactSet

  • Does credit remain tight? Currently credit is tight. Wells Fargo* announced on 2/26/14 that they dropped their FICO minimum on FHA Loans to 600; Will other lenders follow Wells Fargo’s lead in lowering FICO minimums? If they do, we may see an increase in potential homebuyers.
  • Mortgage delinquency rates. Do they continue to trend down? If so, banks may be willing to lend.
  • Interest rate increase – gradual or sharp? The Housing market can absorb gradual interest rate increases, however; if we see another sharp increase like we did last summer, it will definitely have a negative impact on the housing market as a sharp increase in interest rates creates concern among potential homebuyers.
  • Monthly jobs report is trending up. As employment increases, the perceived pent-up demand will gradually bring more homebuyers to the market.
  • Supply. Housing supply has been low. Will there be an increase in supply for the spring selling season? Will it be met with increased demand to keep prices up?

Source: “Wells Fargo Lowers Credit Scores for FHA Loans,” National Mortgage News (Feb. 6, 2014)

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are for informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change.

When in Doubt, Blame the Weather

Ryan Dressel Ryan Dressel, Investment Analyst, Brinker Capital

The 2013-2014 winter has been nothing short of a worse-case scenario for the eastern half of the U.S. In Chicago, temperatures fell below zero an astounding 22 times (the Chicago record for a winter is 25), and let’s not forget the combined 67 inches of snow. In Atlanta, the city literally came to a halt during what became known as “Icepocalypse.” In Philadelphia, we’ve seen a total of 58 inches of snow (third highest on record) including 11 different snow storms dropping one inch or more.[1]

Source: TheAtlantic.com

Source: TheAtlantic.com

Those three locales give you a pretty good idea of just how wide spread the wrath of winter is this year. While it is difficult to measure the exact impact of the weather on the economy, we can conclude that economic activity will certainly lag in January, February and March. Despite the fact that most economic indices account for seasonal effects, they do not account for outlier years like this one. Weather has been blamed for poor economic reports ranging from job growth, to new housing starts, to manufacturing—but is it justified?

A 2010 study by the American Meteorological Society determined which U.S. states are most sensitive to extreme weather variability as it relates to economic output.[2]

Dressel_Weather_2.21.14_1The research concluded that the location with the most sensitive industries had the largest total economic effect. For example, agriculture is the most sensitive on an absolute basis, but the fact that agriculture makes up such a small percentage of most states’ Gross State Product (GSP) means that extreme weather has a small total effect on sensitivity. Conversely, manufacturing, financial services, and real estate have a large relative sensitivity because of their GSP impact. As you can see on the map, the states where these industries have a significant economic impact, translates in higher sensitivity to extreme weather.

The severity of winter in the states colored red and yellow justifies the weather-related hype, while the ones in blue can be ignored for economic purposes. If you include the effects of the Government shutdown, we’ve had four consecutive months of cloudy data that we can’t put into clear context!

[1] National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
[2] U.S. Economic Sensitivity to Weather Variability. Jeffrey K. Lazo, Megan Lawson, Peter Larsen, Donald Waldman. December 28, 2010.