Investment Insights Podcast: Seasonally Stronger Markets Ahead

Hart_Podcast_338x284Chris Hart, Core Investment Manager

On this week’s podcast (recorded September 16, 2016), Chris provides a fresh market update as volatility has picked up recently. Listen in as he discusses market performance and what’s to come in the fourth quarter.

Quick hits:

  • Returns are positive for most segments of the markets; however, volatility has picked up recently and equities have declined over the past week or two
  • This is typically a weak part of the calendar year for the markets, but this soft period should be behind us soon as mid-October typically marks the end of this softer stretch in the markets before seasonally stronger fourth quarter takes hold
  • A rate hike can’t be discounted completely and could be a shock to the markets if it happens.

For the rest of Chris’s insight, click here to listen to the audio recording.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

Investment Insights Podcast: Outlook Positive Despite Rate Hike Possibility

magnotta_headshot_2016Amy Magnotta, CFASenior Investment Manager, Brinker Capital

On this week’s podcast (recorded September 9, 2016), Amy reviews how the markets performed during August and provides an outlook to what’s ahead. Here a few quick hits before you listen:

  • August was a relatively calm month for financial markets. Large cap developed market equities eked out small gains, while emerging markets, high-yield bonds and small caps fared better.
  • U.S. economic data releases have been mixed, but lean positive. Yet, with better economic data comes the possibility of an additional Fed interest rate hike sooner rather than later.
  • While the possibility of a rate hike could adversely affect markets in the near term, it doesn’t change our positive intermediate-term outlook.
  • Risks facing the economy include the potential for a central bank policy mistake, uncertainty surrounding the upcoming presidential election, and disappointing economic growth outside of the U.S.
  • We expect higher volatility to continue as we digest the actions of global central banks, but our view on risk assets still tilts positive over the intermediate term. Increased volatility often leads to pockets of attractive opportunities.

Click here to listen to Amy’s full audio recording.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

Investment Insights Podcast: Your Third Quarter Status Report

Hart_Podcast_338x284Chris Hart, Core Investment Manager

On this week’s podcast (recorded August 30, 2016), Chris is back on the mic to provide a market update as the end of the third quarter draws near. Discussion topics include the health of global and domestic markets and reaction to the latest Fed meeting, but here a few quick hits before you listen:

  • So far in the third quarter, despite major indices posting modest losses last week, markets continue to move higher as we approach Labor Day and the end of summer.
  • Fed Chair Yellen is still not willing to commit to a rate hike, but also noted that the case for a rate hike has strengthened in recent months.
  • While the September rate hike probability fell to less than 10% post-Brexit, it has now moved to 42% according to Haver Analytics in recent weeks.
  • Overall, we remain constructive on risk assets, but believe prudence is warranted and volatility should continue to trend higher.

For the rest of Chris’s insight, click here to listen to the audio recording.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

Investment Insights Podcast: The Reluctant Bull

Hart_Podcast_338x284Chris Hart, Core Investment Manager

On this week’s podcast (recorded August 19, 2016), Chris discusses the current market environment, the looming concerns for investors, and what to expect as we near the end of the summer cycle.

Listen to the podcast here, but first, a few quick hits:

  • Markets continue to move higher, leading experts to describe it as a “reluctant bull” with investors skeptical of the rally.
  • Concerns over oil, China, and the Federal Reserve continue to preoccupy the markets and are still worrisome, but perhaps less so than a few months ago.
  • Domestic stocks have risen in six of the last eight weeks thanks in part to more positive corporate results.
  • While the economy is late in the business cycle and not calling for an acceleration, the strength of the market is noteworthy.
  • As we enter the seasonally weak late summer period in the markets, uncertainty remains especially with the upcoming election.
  • Overall, we remain constructive on risk assets but cautious in our outlook and we maintain our focus on finding select opportunities to take advantage of.

For Chris’s full insight, click here to listen to the audio recording.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

August 2016 Monthly Market and Economic Outlook

Amy MagnottaAmy Magnotta, CFASenior Investment Manager, Brinker Capital

On this podcast, Amy reviews July’s market activity and provides an outlook into what’s in store for August and the rest of 2016. Here are some quick hits before you have a listen:

  • Investor confidence resumed and fears of global contagion dissipated when it became evident that the negative implications of the Brexit decision would likely be contained to the UK and areas of Europe.
  • U.S. real GDP data was lackluster, but consumer spending remained strong and jobless claims low.
  • Despite the shock of the Brexit decision during the end of the second quarter, international equities finished the month in strong positive territory, outpacing domestic equities.
  • We expect a higher level of volatility as markets assess the impact of slower global growth, the actions of policymakers and the uncertainty surrounding the U.S. presidential election; but our view on risk assets still tilts positive over the near term.

Click here to listen to the full podcast. A PDF version of Amy’s commentary is available to download in the Brinker Capital Resource Center. Find it here >>

Source: Brinker Capital. Views expressed are for informational purposes only. Holdings subject to change. Not all asset classes referenced in this material may be represented in your portfolio. Indices are unmanaged and an investor cannot invest directly in an index. All investments involve risk including loss of principal. Fixed income investments are subject to interest rate and credit risk. Foreign securities involve additional risks, including foreign currency changes, political risks, foreign taxes, and different methods of accounting and financial reporting. Brinker Capital Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

Earnings Season Upon Us, but Information Void Looms

Raupp_Podcast_GraphicJeff Raupp, CFA, Senior Investment Manager

On this week’s podcast (recorded August 1, 2016), Jeff covers the current themes impacting markets, including Brexit, earnings season, and the presidential election. Highlights of his discussion include:

  • Since the initial negative reaction from the Brexit vote in late June, markets have rebounded sharply, with U.S. stocks up over 15% since the June 27 lows and international stocks up over 10%.
  • Late summer and fall loom as somewhat of an information void, where economic data is a little sparser and investors have a harder time seeing the impetus for the next leg up in the market.
  • It wouldn’t be surprising to see a pause in the upward momentum in the markets until we get more clarity about the direction of the election.
  • This past week, housing, earnings, employment and wages all had positive reports, but were offset by a very disappointing GDP number.

For Jeff’s full insight, click here to listen to the audio recording.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

Carousel of Political Discontent

Stuart Quint, Investment Insights PodcastStuart P. Quint, CFA, Senior Investment Manager & International Strategist

Hung parliaments in three recent elections may have investment implications. On this latest podcast, Stuart discusses what’s happening in Spain, Austria and Australia.

Quick hits:

  • Recent elections in Spain, Austria, and Australia highlight that voters are divided and unable to render a clear mandate for government.
  • Other parts of Europe appear vulnerable.
  • Politics pose risk to financial markets; loose monetary policy likely to persist in many places.

What do Spain, Austria, and Australia have in common? (No, this is not a trivia question nor the opening line of a bad joke.)

Each country in recent weeks has held elections, all of which failed to elect governments backed by a majority of the vote (with one case leading to yet another election).  Tepid economic growth has led to divided voters that could make it more difficult for governments to enact policies needed to stimulate economies. They each are riding “a carousel of political discontent”.

Starting in Spain

On June 26, Spain held general elections for the second time in six months (results of which were overshadowed by the Brexit referendum).  Both elections failed to confirm one party with a sufficient majority to form a government.  In fact, the two centrist-right and left parties lost parliamentary seats to smaller fringe parties. However, the June election did result in a higher seat count for the ruling center-right party.  Hope exists for the incumbent center-right party to be able to form a coalition, though most likely without support of a majority of parliament.[1]

Sobering developments in Austria

In May, Austria tried to elect a president, an office with more ceremonial functions than real political power.  The two final candidates came from the Greens and the far-right Freedom Party, parties not belonging to the traditional establishment.  After a very slight victory (50.3% to 49.7%)[2] for the Green candidate, the Austrian Constitutional Court annulled the results and rescheduled the election for October.[3]  Austria potentially might be the first country in the EU to elect a president from the far right, a sobering development in light of populist antipathy to the Euro project.

Instability in Australia

Elections that were intended to solidify the ruling coalition in Australia could end up having the opposite effect.  The ruling Liberal-National party coalition has lost seats in both houses of Parliament and faces the risk of forming a minority government.  Yet again, fringe parties siphoned off votes both from the incumbents and main opposition party Liberals. Australia has already suffered through five different Prime Ministers in the last six years. The last thing it needs is another unstable government and the risk of political paralysis and potential new elections.

Notable similarities

Three different countries with three different cultures still share some common themes. Slow economic growth has contributed to disillusionment with establishment parties. The new wrinkle is that cohesion in the traditional opposition, as well as incumbent parties, is unraveling. Fringe parties representing both ideological (far right and left) as well as parochial interests are gaining. Though unable to govern themselves, these fringe parties potentially could play greater roles as “kingmakers” for establishment parties to form ruling coalitions. More focus would be spent on holding together the coalition and catering to parochial issues rather than carrying through reforms to stoke confidence in the economy. Weak coalitions are prone to collapse and thus, new elections.

What’s the impact on other countries?

Other candidates for this cycle of discontent stand out in Europe, particularly countries in the Euro.  With its past history of rotating governments, Italy might reemerge as the popularity of incumbent PM Renzi has taken a hit from reform setbacks and lack of economic growth. The fringe opposition party Five Star enjoys significant popularity as shown in victories in recent municipal elections. The party espouses holding a referendum on Italy’s membership in the Euro. It might see opportunity to challenge Renzi in October when a referendum on voting reform is scheduled. If Renzi were to lose that vote, early elections are likely to ensue.

France also stands out with a vigorous populist far-right opposition party in the National Front of Marine LePen.  General elections in 2017 with the incumbent government suffering from depressed approval ratings could introduce additional market volatility. Along with a stagnant economy, France has also suffered backlash against efforts to reform labor markets.

What needs to change?

Political malcontent with economic growth has the potential to continue and add to market volatility. It also could lead to paralysis on fiscal and structural reform needed to accelerate growth. One consequence is likely: central banks will not be retreating from active monetary policy anytime soon in the face of weak growth, even if much of their dry powder has already been spent. Government inaction will still be replaced by central bank stimulation unless the situation changes.

Click here to listen to the podcast.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, a Registered Investment Advisor.

[1] http://www.abc.es/espana/abci-rajoy-cita-manana-moncloa-201607051229_noticia.html  accessed on July 5, 2016.

[2] http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-05-24/independent-van-der-bellen-wins-austrian-presidential-vote/7439372  accessed on July 5, 2016.

[3] https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/jul/01/austrian-presidential-election-result-overturned-and-must-be-held-again-hofer-van-der-bellen accessed on July 5, 2016.

Investment Insights Podcast: Brexit Referendum Approaches

Stuart Quint, Investment Insights PodcastStuart P. Quint, CFA, Senior Investment Manager & International Strategist

On this week’s podcast (recorded June 15, 2016), Stuart discusses the potential repercussions facing the United Kingdom and the European Union should the vote for Brexit render a “yes” decision.

Highlights of this podcast are shared in our previous blog, but please click here to listen to the full audio recording.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, a Registered Investment Advisor.

Investment Insights Podcast: Frontier Markets Still Attractive

Stuart Quint, Investment Insights PodcastStuart P. Quint, CFA, Senior Investment Manager & International Strategist

On this week’s podcast (recorded June 2, 2016), Stuart weighs in on frontier markets and how this space is still an attractive area for investors.

Quick take:

  • Today’s frontier markets closer to yesterday’s higher-growth emerging markets.
  • Frontier markets are different and may offer potentially higher growth prospects relative to re-emerging markets.
  • Frontier markets can offer potential positive benefits in portfolio diversification.
Source: MSCI, Blackrock

Source: MSCI, Blackrock

Source: MSCI, Blackrock

Source: MSCI, Blackrock

Frontier markets still offer investors the potential for higher returns and lower correlation within broadly diversified portfolios. Although emerging and frontier markets both offer younger populations and higher economic growth potential relative to developed markets, there are also key differences that currently favor frontier markets.

Frontier markets include a variety of countries that, in many cases, are more tied to domestic factors as opposed to global growth. Countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, such as Kenya and Nigeria, and in South Asia, such as Vietnam and Bangladesh, offer potential investment opportunities. Several of these markets are enacting structural reform and attracting foreign direct investment to improve economic growth prospects. While depressed oil prices have an impact on growth in Middle East economies, such as Oman and Qatar, these countries also boast higher incomes and strong population growth rates.

Source: MSCI, Blackrock

Source: MSCI, Blackrock

Source: MSCI, Blackrock

Source: MSCI, Blackrock

In contrast, emerging markets are more of a mixed bag. The larger BRICK economies (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Korea) within emerging markets contain a spectrum of moderate growth to stagnation along with banking sectors hobbled by large and rising bad credit. Depressed commodity prices directly hurt Brazil and Russia, while a capacity glut in basic materials impacts bank loans in China and India. The question of “whither the BRICKs” is vital to the direction of emerging markets given they comprise over half of the index.[1]

Investing in frontier markets provides more exposure to domestic growth sectors whereas emerging markets are more geared toward industries influenced by global commodity exports. Domestic sectors account for three out of every four dollars in frontier markets, while they comprise only one out of every two dollars in emerging markets. Industry sectors related to global trends (in many cases commodities) comprise nearly half of emerging market companies but only a quarter of frontier markets.[2]

Frontier markets only comprise less than 3% of the world’s total market capitalization.[3]  Coupled with potentially faster growth relative to the developed world, further structural reform could propel further growth in capital markets.

Superior population growth is one supportive factor. Median population growth of 1.5% in Frontier markets exceeds growth in both developed and emerging markets.

2014 Median Compound Annual Population Growth
Frontier Markets 1.5%
Developed Markets 0.7%
Emerging Markets 0.9%

Source: World Bank and Brinker Capital

A growing variety of funds and ETFs have come to market and allowed greater access to investing in frontier markets in recent years. Nonetheless, frontier markets continue to offer potential benefits to diversifying investment portfolios. Even over the last five years, frontier markets still show lower correlation to broad equity indices (and even lower relative to emerging markets).

Please click here to listen to the full recording.

[1] BRICK comprises 54% of the MSCI Emerging Markets Free Index.  Source: MSCI and Blackrock.
[2] MSCI, Blackrock, and Brinker Capital
[3] Bloomberg and Brinker Capital

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, a Registered Investment Advisor.

Investment Insights Podcast – Brazil: Does Rousseff’s Impeachment Muddy the Future?

Stuart Quint, Investment Insights PodcastStuart P. Quint, CFA, Senior Investment Manager & International Strategist

On this week’s podcast (recorded May 16, 2016), Stuart discusses what the President of Brazil’s impeachment means for the near-term future of the country. If you missed Stuart’s initial framework around Brazil, you can catch up here first.

As discussed, why talk about Brazil?

  • It’s the largest economy in Latin America.
  • It’s the eighth largest economy in the world.
  • For the last several years, it’s been a large drag on emerging market economic growth.
  • There is potential to have a positive impact with the recent shock to the political system.

What does Rousseff’s impeachment announcement entail?

  • Brazilian senate approved in large majority to impeach President Dilma Rousseff and replace with Vice President Michel Temer.
  • General elections to take place in 2018, and with the Olympics in Rio a few months away, the window for the government to pass reforms is short.
  • Rousseff is the third president to be impeached since 1992.
  • Key test will be whether such enthusiasm for impeaching Rousseff will apply to tough votes on fiscal reform needed to restore economic confidence in Brazil.

What’s the upside with Temer?

  • Michel Temer has already named a cabinet that includes former president of the Central Bank of Brazil, Henirque Meirelles
  • Meirelles presided over the strong Brazilian economy during the two terms of former President Lula prior to Rousseff taking office.
  • The government deficit lies at the heart of what ails Brazil and might improve under the right circumstances.

How does the government begin to reign in the deficit?

  • Debt to GDP is growing 10% a year.
  • The government, simply put, must raise revenues and cut expenditures; but, this is easier said than done.
  • Higher taxes are troublesome and could stunt the already weak economy.
  • One tax likely to be reintroduced is a basis point tax on financial transactions, which should have a high success rate in collecting revenues, but it also could dampen economic activity.
  • Expenditures could be difficult to reduce given legal restrictions and the still-fragile political situation.
  • Fiscal expenditures offer the potential to improve the fiscal situation, but it is also the most susceptible to politics.

 Where does Brazil stand now?

  • Given that Temer has an approval rating just barely above that of Rousseff¹, it is unclear whether he has enough political capital to push through needed reforms.
  • The ongoing corruption investigations known as Carwash potentially affects politicians of all stripes.
  • Opposing interests in Congress might find it in their own self-interest to “bite the bullet” on passing just enough reforms to stabilize the country in time for new elections in 2018.
  • In short, while the economic obstacles are challenging, it is possible to see improvement in the fiscal balances.

Please click here to listen to the full recording.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, a Registered Investment Advisor.