Investment Insights Podcast: When the macro clouds clear

Holland_Podcast_150x126Tim Holland, CFA, Senior Vice President, Global Investment Strategist

On this week’s podcast (recorded September 15, 2017), Tim discusses how Brinker Capital’s focus will remain on market and economic fundamentals.

Quick hits:

  • Despite the strong fundamentals in early September, the market was languishing as investors focused on current political and geo-political events.
  • We will of course continue to monitor political and geo-political events, but our focus will remain on market and economic fundamentals; those factors that more than any other drive stock prices over the long-term.

For Tim’s full insights, click here to listen to the audio recording.

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The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

Monthly Market and Economic Outlook: June 2015

Amy MagnottaAmy Magnotta, CFASenior Investment Manager, Brinker Capital

Financial markets in May were mixed with modestly positive returns in U.S. equity markets (+1.3% for the S&P 500), modestly negative returns for international equity markets (-1.5% for the MSCI ACWI ex USA), and flat returns in U.S. fixed income markets (-0.2% for the Barclays Aggregate). U.S. economic data was on the weaker side, generally attributed to bad weather; however, the labor market continues to show improvement. The expectation is still for the Fed to commence rate hikes later this year.

In U.S. equity markets all sectors were positive for the month except for Energy and Telecom. The healthcare sector led with gains of more than 4%. Small caps led large caps for the month, and growth led value except in the mid cap segment.

International equity markets delivered a small gain in local terms, but the stronger dollar weighed on returns for U.S. investors. Japan gained more than 5% in local terms amid stronger economic data, while Europe gained less than 1% in local terms. Emerging market equities lagged developed markets in May, declining -4% in US dollar terms. China and Brazil were particularly weak performers. Despite weaker performance in May, both developed international and emerging markets lead U.S. equity markets so far this year by a sizeable margin.

The 10-year U.S. Treasury yield ended the month 10 basis points higher at a level of 2.13% and so far in June 10-year yields have backed up another 25 basis points (through June 5). However, because of the small coupon cushion in U.S. Treasuries today, only a small increase in yields can lead to a negative total return for investors. The credit sector was mixed in May, with investment grade experiencing declines and high yield delivering small gains. Municipal bonds continued to underperform taxable bonds. Year to date high yield leads all fixed income sectors.

Our outlook remains biased in favor of the positives, but recognizing risks remain. We have entered the second half of the business cycle, but remain optimistic regarding the global macro backdrop and risk assets over the intermediate-term. As a result our strategic portfolios are positioned with a modest overweight to overall risk. A number of factors should support the economy and markets over the intermediate term

  • Global monetary policy accommodation: Despite the Federal Reserve heading toward monetary policy normalization, the ECB and the Bank of Japan have both executed bold easing measures in an attempt to support their economies.
  • U.S. growth stable and inflation tame: Despite a soft patch in the first quarter, U.S. economic growth is expected to turn positive in the second quarter and the labor market has markedly improved. Reported inflation measures and inflation expectations remain below the Fed’s target.
  • U.S. companies remain in solid shape: U.S. companies are beginning to put cash to work through capex, hiring and M&A. Earnings growth outside of the energy sector is positive, and margins have been resilient.
  • Less uncertainty in Washington: After serving as a major uncertainty over the last few years, Washington has done little damage so far this year; however, Congress will still need to address the debt ceiling before the fall. Government spending has shifted to a contributor to GDP growth in 2015 after years of fiscal drag.

However, risks facing the economy and markets remain, including:

  • Timing/impact of Fed tightening: The Fed has set the stage to commence rate hikes later this year. Both the timing of the first rate increase, and the subsequent path of rates is uncertain, which could lead to increased market volatility.
  • Slower global growth: Economic growth outside the U.S. is decidedly weaker. It remains to be seen whether central bank policies can spur sustainable growth in Europe and Japan. Growth in emerging economies has slowed as well.
  • Geopolitical risks: Could cause short-term volatility.

Despite higher than average valuations and neutral investor sentiment, the trend is still positive and the macro backdrop leans favorable, so we believe there is the potential for additional equity market gains. The quantitative easing programs of the European Central Bank and the Bank of Japan, combined with signs of economic improvement, have us more positive in the short-term regarding international developed equities, but we need to see follow-through with structural reforms. We expect U.S. interest rates to continue to normalize; however, U.S. Treasuries still offer relative value over sovereign bonds in other developed markets, which could keep a ceiling on long-term rates in the short-term.

As we operate without the liquidity provided by the Fed and move through the second half of the business cycle, we expect higher levels of both equity and bond market volatility. This volatility should lead to more attractive opportunities for active management across asset classes. Our portfolios are positioned to take advantage of continued strength in risk assets, and we continue to emphasize high conviction opportunities within asset classes, as well as strategies that can exploit market inefficiencies.

Asset Class Outlook Comments
U.S. Equity + Quality bias
Intl Equity + Neutral vs. U.S.
Fixed Income +/- High-yield favorable
Absolute Return + Benefit from higher volatility
Real Assets +/- Favor global natural resources
Private Equity + Later in cycle

Source: Brinker Capital. Views expressed are for informational purposes only. Holdings subject to change. Not all asset classes referenced in this material may be represented in your portfolio. All investments involve risk including loss of principal. Fixed income investments are subject to interest rate and credit risk. Foreign securities involve additional risks, including foreign currency changes, political risks, foreign taxes, and different methods of accounting and financial reporting.

News Out of Japan

Andy RosenbergerAndrew Rosenberger, CFA, Senior Investment Manager, Brinker Capital

The recent sell-off in Japan has many investors concerned that “Abenomics” may be little more than smoke and mirrors than the start of a cyclical, or even more importantly secular, rally. While the Japanese equity market can be volatile, especially given the monstrous 80%+ rally since November of last year, continuing macroeconomic evidence does suggest that the economy is improving. ISI Research has done a nice job tracking the macro data out of Japan. In one of their recent pieces, they make the argument that during the last week of May, 14 out of 17 data points showed signs of the economy improving. See chart below.

Signs of Strength Signs of Weakness
1. Construction Orders 1. DPI Per Household
2. Employment 2. Household Expenditures
3. Housing Starts 3. Dept. Store Sales
4. Industrial Production
5. Insured Employees
6. Job Ratio
7. Job Offers Ratio
8. Mffg PMI
9. Public Works Starts
10. Retail Sales
11. Retail Stores
12. Small Business Confidence
13. Vehicle Exports
14. Vehicle Production  Source: ISI Research

Moreover, their proprietary Economic Diffusion Index has climbed to record territory. The recent pullback in the market can be a hard pill to swallow for those just waking up to the Japanese story. Yet, we must also consider that a 15% pullback in the context of a nearly 85% run in the equity market still leaves markets up 57% from where it was just six months ago.

Economic Headwinds and Tailwinds

Magnotta @AmyMagnotta, CFA, Brinker Capital

We continue to approach our macro view as a balance between headwinds and tailwinds. The scale tipped slightly in favor of tailwinds to start the year as we saw a slight pickup in the U.S. economy, some resolution on fiscal policy, and even more accommodative monetary policy globally. However, we continue to face global macro risks, especially in Europe, which could result in bouts of market volatility. The strong market move in the first quarter, combined with higher levels of sentiment, and a potentially disappointing earnings season, may leave us susceptible to a pull-back in the near term, but our longer-term view remains constructive. While the second quarter may bring weaker growth in the U.S., consensus is for economic activity to pick up in the second half of the year.

Tailwinds
Accommodative monetary policy: The Fed continues with their Quantitative Easing Program and will keep short-term rates on hold until they see a sustained pickup in employment. The European Central Bank has also pledged support to defend the Euro and has committed to sovereign bond purchases of countries who apply for aid. Now the Bank of Japan is embracing an aggressive monetary easing program in an attempt to boost growth and inflation. The markets remain awash in liquidity.

U.S. companies remain in solid shape: U.S. companies have solid balance sheets that are flush with cash that could be put to work through M&A, capital expenditures or hiring, or returned to shareholders in the form of  dividends or share buybacks. While estimates are coming down, profits are still at high levels.

Housing market improvement: The housing market is showing signs of improvement. Home prices are  increasing, helped by tight supply. The S&P/Case-Shiller 20-City Home Price Index gained +8.1% for the 12-month period ending January 2013. Sales activity is picking up and affordability remains at high levels. An improvement in housing, typically a consumer’s largest asset, is a boost to confidence.

Equity Fund Flows Turn Positive:  After experiencing years of significant outflows, investors have begun to reallocate to equity mutual funds. Investors have added over $67 billion to equity funds so far in 2013 (ICI, as of  3/27/13), compared to outflows of $153 billion in 2012. Investors continue to add money to fixed income funds as
well ($70 billion so far this year).
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Headwinds

European sovereign debt crisis and recession: The promise of bond purchases by the ECB has driven down borrowing costs for problem countries and bought policymakers time, but it cannot solve the underlying  problems in Europe. Austerity measures are serving only to weaken growth further and cause higher unemployment and social unrest. After how it dealt with Cyprus, there is again risk of policy error in Europe.  We are also closely watching the Italian elections in June after February’s elections were inconclusive.

U.S. policy uncertainty continues: After passing the fiscal cliff compromise to start the year, Washington passed a short-term extension of the debt ceiling and more recently agreed on a continuing resolution to avoid a government shutdown. The sequester, which was temporarily delayed as part of the fiscal cliff deal, went into effect on March 1. The automatic spending cuts have not yet been felt by most, but it will soon start to show  up in the second quarter and will shave an estimated 0.5% from GDP. In addition, the debt ceiling will need to be addressed again this summer.

Geopolitical Risks:
Recent events in North Korea are cause for concern.

This commentary is intended to provide opinions and analysis of the market and economy, but is not intended to provide personalized  investment advice. Statements referring to future actions or events, such as the future financial performance of certain asset classes, market segments, economic trends, or the market as a whole are based on the current expectations and projections about future events provided by various sources, including Brinker Capital’s Investment Management Group. These statements are not guarantees of future performance, and actual events may differ materially from those discussed. Diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss in a declining market, including possible loss of principal. This commentary includes information obtained from third-party sources. Brinker Capital believes those sources to be accurate and reliable; however, we are not responsible for errors by third-party sources on which we reasonably rely.

Economic Headwinds and Tailwinds

We continue to approach our macro view as a balance between cyclical tailwinds and more structural headwinds. While we have seen some improvement in the economy and strong global equity markets, helped by easy monetary policy, we continue to face global macro risks and uncertainties. The unresolved risks could result in bouts of market volatility. As a result, portfolios have a modest defensive bias, and are focused on high conviction opportunities within asset classes.

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