Setting the record straight on common retirement myths

frank_randall

Frank Randall, Regional Director, Retirement Plan Services

It’s National Retirement Planning Week and an important time to take a closer look at some of the common myths that if followed, could decrease your spending power, and your happiness, in retirement.

  1. “It’s too late to start saving now.” Even in your late 40s or early 50s, you still have 15 to 20 years to grow your nest egg. The government has given incentives by enacting tax laws designed to help people over the age of 50 to contribute a little extra to retirement plans so they can catch up as retirement nears.
  2. “I can’t start saving for retirement until I pay off my debt.” Not all debt is bad. A financial advisor can help you differentiate between debt you can carry and the debt you should prioritize paying off over retirement savings (i.e., high-interest credit cards).
  3. “I’ll start saving after I get my kids through college.” Borrowing for college is easier than borrowing for retirement.
  4. “I need to be super conservative in my investments so my money will last.” The flaw in this strategy is that it doesn’t consider the impact of inflation. While inflation has been tame in recent memory, even at 2-3% over long periods of time, inflation can have a devastating impact on wealth.
  5. “It’ll just be me (and my spouse).” Many retirees either underestimate or do not anticipate the financial toll associated with providing financial support to their adult children, yet over one-third (36%) of the young adults ages 18-31 live with their parents. It’s not uncommon for the adult children to have children of their own, adding layers of both complexity and expense. Furthermore, Securian Financial Group reported that only 10% of the adult children living with their parents contribute to the household finances (e.g., pay rent). Retirees may also have the added expense of providing care to elderly relatives. In a recent blog, John Solomon, EVP of our Wealth Advisory group, pointed out that 25% of adults, mostly Baby Boomers, provide care to a parent.
  6. “I’ll pay it back.” Avoid borrowing against your retirement account. Even if you repay the loan, your nest egg will suffer because you will probably incur interest charges and fees. In addition, you will miss out on the compounding effect of the original funds, your contributions may be suspended while the loan is outstanding, and you will be more likely to sell low and buy high.
  7. “I won’t have to pay as much in taxes.” In retirement your income will be lowered, which will in turn lower your effective tax rate. Keep in mind; however, cost of living is impacted by all forms of taxes, including state income tax, local income tax, property tax, sales tax, capital gains tax, and Medicare tax. Also, in retirement you’ll likely have fewer federal deductions and dependents to claim, so a greater percentage of your income goes to the government.
  8. “Medicare will cover my health care expenses.” Medicare doesn’t cover everything, and the items not covered can add up. The Center for Retirement Research at Boston College estimates out of pocket medical care expenses for retirees at approximately $4,300/year for individuals and $8,600/year for couples. These amounts don’t include long-term care expenses. Many retirees purchase supplemental policies (called Medigap) to cover co-pays, deductibles and other expenses that Medicare does not. Medigap policies can ultimately cost you more than you paid for health care covered when employed.
  9. “I won’t have as many expenses.” Retirement expenses might not be as low as you think. Unstructured time often leads to greater spending. Also, many people wait until retirement to increase travel and pursue hobbies when work is no longer standing in the way.
  10. “I will have more time to study the markets in retirement.” The more you know about investment principles and the long-term historical record of the market, the better outcomes you can expect to achieve in your retirement portfolio. The American Association of Individual Investors found that investing knowledge enhances risk-adjusted returns by at least 1.3% annually. Over 30 years, the improved portfolio performance leads to 25% greater wealth. So, don’t wait until you are in retirement to begin studying up on investment principles. Start today.
  11. “I don’t need help.” While your financial mission in retirement may seem straightforward—to not outlive your money—the decisions you face along the way can be complicated. An experienced financial advisor can help you manage your retirement portfolio to meet your preservation and growth objectives, help you establish an income strategy matched to your spending needs, and track your spending versus assumptions. If a crisis arises, a trusted financial advisor will know your financial history and can help make decisions in your best interests.

For over 10 years, Brinker Capital Retirement Plan Services has worked with advisors to offer plan sponsors the solutions to help participants reach their retirement goals. When plan sponsors appoint Brinker Capital as the ERISA 3(38) investment manager, this allows them to transfer fiduciary responsibility for the selection and management of their investments so they can focus on the best interests of their employees.  This fiduciary responsibility is something that Brinker Capital has acknowledged, in writing, since our founding in 1987.

Click here to learn more about Brinker Capital Retirement Plan Services.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

Plan Today, Retire Tomorrow

Roddy MarinoRoddy Marino, CIMA, Executive Vice President
National Accounts & Distribution

One essential consideration, whether you’re retiring next month or 50 years from now,  is that you ensure that your savings are aligned with your investment goals. With 33% of U.S. employees not adequately saving to fund their retirement1, this is a good opportunity to look at your own plan today and address any gaps.

While we know that there are behavioral impediments that we must overcome as we prepare for retirement, there are also some certainties that we need to account for:

  1. You’ll need cash.
  2. The amount you spend impacts how long your savings will last.
  3. Money that is not set aside for spending should be invested wisely.
  4. You’ll fare better when you know where you stand. Don’t just wait for your quarterly report to see how you’re doing—have regular check-ins with your financial advisor.
  5. Markets are volatile and can at times be a bumpy ride; but it important to stay the course.

A financial professional can help to guide you through the ups and downs of the market and work with you to create a retirement plan that meets your needs.  While longevity, medical expenses and taxes are among some of the elephants in the room that may be keeping you from planning for retirement, those who begin early develop formal plans and have little to fear.  Retirement resources are growing as quickly as our lifespans—oftentimes you simply just have to ask!

For 10 years, Brinker Capital Retirement Plan Services has been working with advisors to offer plan sponsors the solutions to help participants reach their retirement goals.  The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

Source:

1Retirement Confidence Survey 2015, Employee Benefit Research Institute

Money Missteps to Avoid in Retirement

frank_randallFrank Randall, AIF®, Regional Director, Retirement Plan Services

 “Good decisions come from experience,

and experience comes from bad decisions.”

By the time you feel ready enough to retire, you have likely had your fair share of blunders along the way. Now seasoned with experience, the realization that mistakes are inevitable, and having the ability to recover can make the difference between success and failure.

Here are some of the most common missteps in retirement:

  • Focusing on the wrong factors. Many people decide to retire when they reach a certain age, job fluctuations or business cycles. While these factors may have influence, your emotional readiness, savings, debt, future budget and income plan to sustain your desired lifestyle must also be considered.
  • Overlooking the importance of your Social Security election. Some experts say the difference between a good Social Security benefit election and a poor one could equate to more than $100,000 in income.[1] The biggest decision retirees face concerning Social Security is when to start collecting. Just because you can start receiving benefits at age 62 doesn’t necessarily mean you should. If you delay your election until age 70, you may receive 32% more in payments so it may make sense to delay receipt of benefits as long as you can meet your expense obligations.
  • Underestimating the cost of retirement. Most people estimate retirement expenses to be around 85% of after-tax working income. In reality, however, many retirees experience lifestyle sticker-shock as the realities of retirement. One common problem retirees have when budgeting for retirement expenses is that they overlook items like inflation, future taxes, health care, home and car maintenance, and the financial dependence of their loved ones (e.g., sandwich generation costs).
  • Retiring with too much debt. A simple rule of thumb is to pay off as much debt as possible during your earning years. Otherwise, debt repayment will cause a strain on your retirement savings.
  • Failing to come up with an income strategy. Saving is only part of the retirement planning process. You also have to think about spending and decide where and in what order to tap investments. When thinking about cash flow needs throughout retirement, one must also consider how retirement funds can continue to generate growth. An effective way to solve retirement income needs is to have a liquid cash reserve account tied to your portfolio.  The reserve is tapped to deliver a “paycheck” to help you meet predictable expenses. The cash withdrawn is replenished by investments in dividend- and income-producing securities.
  • Dialing too far back on investment risk. As many workers near retirement, they become fixated on cash needs, thus dialing back risk and becoming more conservative in their investments. Unfortunately, the returns generated by ultra-conservative investments may not keep pace with inflation and future tax liabilities. Because retirement can last upwards of 20 years, retirees must set both preservation and growth investment objectives.
  • Not validating the assumptions made during the retirement planning process. You make certain assumptions about investment performance, expenses, and retirement age when you initially create your projected retirement plan. At least annually, you should reconcile your projections against reality. Are you spending more and earning less than anticipated? If so, you may have to make changes, either to your plan or your lifestyle.
  • Providing financial support to adult children. Over the last decade, the number of adult children who live with their parents has risen 15% to a historic high of 36%. Providing financial support to anyone, particularly an adult child, is stressful. It could strain retirement savings and ultimately could create long-term financial dependency in your child.
  • Going it alone. While your financial mission in retirement may seem straightforward—don’t outlive your money—the decisions you make along the way can be complicated. An experienced financial advisor can give you piece of mind for many reasons. An advisor can help you manage your retirement portfolio to meet your preservation and growth objectives, help you establish an income strategy that is matched to your spending needs, and track your spending versus assumptions. If a crisis arises, a trusted financial advisor will already know your financial history and can help make decisions that are in your best interests. Similarly, it is extremely helpful to have a trusted advisor relationship solidified in the event your cognitive abilities decline and you need help with decisions.

[1] http://www.cbsnews.com/news/a-great-new-tool-for-deciding-when-to-take-social-security/

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

The Impact of Student Loans on Your Own Retirement

Roddy MarinoRoddy Marino, CIMA, Executive Vice President
National Accounts & Distribution

An education is one of the greatest gifts a parent or grandparent can give to the next generation. The problem for many, however, is that it comes at the cost of their own retirement.

People over the age of 60 represent the fastest-growing segment of individuals taking out loans for education. Over the past decade, student loans taken out by individuals over the age of 60 grew from $6 billion in 2004 to $58 billion in 2014. To put the dollars into perspective, consider another staggering statistic—the numbers of senior citizens with student debt exceed 760,000. Some have co-signed loans or taken Parent PLUS loans to help children or grandchildren get an education. Other seniors carry old debt from when they returned to school to get advanced degrees or in the pursuit of new skills needed for a career change.

A mistake some retirees make is they incorrectly assume that they will never have to repay their student debt. Only two things can make federal college debt go away: satisfaction or death of the borrower.

shutterstock_44454148Federal student loans aren’t forgiven at retirement or any age after. Bankruptcy won’t even discharge a federal student loan, and the consequences to a senior who defaults on a federal loan are severe. The government can garnish Social Security benefits and other wages. Recent reports indicate over 150,000 retirees have at least one Social Security payment reduced to offset federal student loans. This number represents a drastic increase from the 31,000 impacted in the year 2002.

The government can withhold up to 15% of a borrower’s retirement benefits and can also withhold tax refunds in the event the borrower defaults on a college loan.

If repayment is not possible, you may want to explore a few options to minimize the impact on cash flow once you are on a fixed income. You could stretch out the term of the loan as long as possible through extended payments, or enter into an income-driven repayment plan. Typically, borrowers must pay 10-20% of discretionary income in an income-contingent scenario.

Both strategies could reduce your monthly payments; however, ultimately either strategy will result in higher total payments. To put it simply, debt of any kind is best retired before you retire.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

Debt and Skepticism: A Millennial Mindset

Dan WilliamsDan Williams, CFPInvestment Analyst

Having overshot 30 by a couple of years, I have had to come to terms with the many changes that come with my new age group. Some good, such as lower car insurance rates. Some bad, such as feeling that 9:00pm is closer to the departure time rather than arrival time for a social gathering. Some are mixed; being called “sir” with a high consistency and no tone of irony. I am also no longer considered to be part of the “young adult” group that is said to represent the emerging consumers in the economy and, subsequently, more closely studied by market researchers. These new kids on the block, known as the Millennials, had the financial crisis occur just as many were entering college and the workforce and were beginning to make their first big life decisions. Not surprisingly, they now think about money differently than I did at their age, just a brief decade ago. So what is the current financial mindset of this group some seven years later?

Goldman Sachs reported, in a June 2015 study, as shown below, that this group upon receiving a windfall of cash would look to pay down debt more than any other option by a wide margin.

Williams_chart1

Goldman Sachs Research Proprietary Survey

The result is not entirely unsurprising given that a majority of college students graduate with debt and, often, this debt is of a daunting amount. However, the magnitude of this victory reflects an overall conservative outlook on how to manage their financial matters.

The second finding, shown below, is of greater concern as it shows Millennials to be very skeptical of investing in the stock market. When asked whether investing in the stock market was a good idea for them, less than 20% answered that the stock market is the best way to save for the future. Approximately twice this amount claimed ignorance, fear of volatility, or lack of perceived fairness as reasons to avoid the stock market. Clearly, the events of the financial crisis have left scars on this group that have yet to heal.

Williams_chart2

Goldman Sachs Research Proprietary Survey

I am left feeling very conflicted for this group’s future financial health. On one hand, it’s very admirable that, unlike some prior young adult groups, this group has realized early on that debt is not something you simply attempt to defer payment of indefinitely. At least in the case of high interest credit card debt, it is hard to find fault with the pay-down-the-debt option as a sound financial decision. However, an inflexible focus on debt repayment combined with shunning or deferring of investing in the equity markets represents a significant challenge to this group’s ability to save meaningfully for the future.

Quite simply, equity investing has been proven to be one of the best ways to grow purchasing power over time. One advantage the Millennials have is ample time to invest, ride out periods of market volatility and let returns compound. To forego any portion of this advantage has potential to be tragic for future savings. Consider a one-year delay in retirement investing at the start of a career The missed opportunity is more than just the amount of one year’s contribution; rather that one year’s contribution compounded with typically 40+ years of returns until retirement. Over 40 years, a single $5,000 investment compounded at 8% becomes over $100,000. Six consecutive years of $5,000 contributions compounds to over $500,000. This is the potential cost of delaying investing just for “a couple of years.” In other words, earlier contributions are invested longer and can compound to greater amounts. On a per-dollar basis, these are the most impactful retirement contributions.

Contribution at start of year Value of contribution at end of year 40, assuming 8% return per year
Year 1 $5,000 $108,622.61
Year 2 $5,000 $100,576.49
Year 3 $5,000 $93,126.38
Year 4 $5,000 $86,228.13
Year 5 $5,000 $79,840.86
Year 6 $5,000 $73,926.72
Total $542,321.72

Source: Brinker Capital

Albert Einstein said, “Compounding interest is the eighth wonder of the world. He who understands it, earns it. He who doesn’t, pays it.” More attention is given by advisors to older clients with more assets and fewer years until retirement. Often this is due to the fact that clients become more tuned into investing matters as they begin to see the light at the end of the tunnel (whether it be the light of retirement or the oncoming train of insufficient savings). However, the greater opportunity for advisors to help a client’s future financial situation occurs earlier on in a client’s investment life. Helping young clients start off with good financial decision making, such as early investing, and letting these good decisions compound, is likely one of the best ways he or she can add value. Each client situation is different as each client has different goals. However a secure retirement is likely a very common dream and as Langston Hughes wrote, “A dream deferred is a dream denied.” Anything that we can do to ensure those dreams are not deferred is truly good work.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

Your Personal Iceberg: There is More to Measuring Success Than What Lies on the Surface

Wallens, JordanJordan Wallens, Regional Director, Retirement Plan Services

This is part two of a two-part blog series.

Next time you catch yourself bemoaning a down day in the stock market, calmly ask yourself, “Did I need the money today?” Benchmarking yourself against daily fluctuations is like looking outside and wondering why that tree in your yard doesn’t look any taller today than it did yesterday.

All of this is not to suggest that you shouldn’t seek help – you should. Simply put, having two sets of eyes and experience on the bridge is always better than one. You’ll fare far better at the essential behavioral art of saving yourself from your base instinct to Buy High and Sell Low, by retaining a seasoned financial advisor to walk beside you and talk you down from the ledge of your litany of poorly-timed short-sighted misbegotten past investment decisions.

The key is to once and for all truly personalize your benchmarks, rather than sweat the screeching heads on CNBC, aka Nickelodeon for adults. Better to diligently establish and maintain your own benchmarks, chart your progress, toward your concrete unchanging goals, including past progress, not just fleeting future predictions.

3.22.13 Wallens Personal Benchmarks2Suppose for example you already have a plan in place to save for retirement. What percentage of annual portfolio growth did you assume? 7%? And how much longer do you expect to work? Well how did you do last year? Forgot already? Too bad, especially if say you earned 12%. Why? Because the good news is, that properly harnessed, last year’s out-performance could very well result in meeting your goals a year earlier than planned. Congratulations, you’re money and you didn’t even know it. (Industry should’ve told you so.) My guess is that rather than properly recognizing, accounting for, and adjusting your risk, you’ve probably already moved on to, “So what’s the best stock to own this year?”

Whenever someone touts a fresh baked personal stock pick, I have a pat response for that too. I ask the inquirer what was the top performing stock last year. For the record, in 2012 that would be homebuilder PulteGroup, yet not a single putative stockpicker polled has answered it correctly. This they rarely relish either. So let me get this straight, if you can’t figure out what was the top stock in the past, do you really think you’ve got edge on what’ll outperform the pack in the future? Sorry, ya don’t. But the best news is, it just doesn’t matter.

Get help, it’s never too late. Start early, and you couldn’t screw it up if you tried. Start too late, and there’s nothing Cramer or anyone can do to help. Rehabilitate your investor behavior. Assess via readily available online tools your personal risk tolerance. Establish and zealously maintain your personal benchmark, un-phased by the chattering masses.

Quit obsessing over schizophrenic ever-changing variables that are outside your control, beyond your comprehension, and have nothing to do with your steady consistent lifelong goals. Ignore the reports of others’ flashy investment performance, and instead manage your personal investor behavior, to achieve the glide path, experience, and inalienable progress toward the life of your dreams. You’ll find you arrive at the station on time and intact, and best of all, without ever disembarking from your righteous path at the least opportune moments.

Another wise fellow declared, “Be the change you hope to see in the world.” But in this instance, ’tis far wiser to simply “Stay the same you want to see from the world.”

Lighten the Load

Sue BerginSue Bergin

Saving for retirement can seem like a daunting task.  When an advisor enters the picture the perceived difficulty of the task lessens.  Before the advisor makes a single recommendation.

It’s all about perception.

A research team at Rutgers recently proved that a task looks lighter if help is promised.  The team asked study participants to estimate how much a sack of potatoes weighed.  If the participant thought he or she would have help lifting it, they guessed it weighed on the average of 9.4 pounds.  If they thought they had to lift it alone, their estimate was 10.5 pounds.

The Rutgers team took a look at how competence shapes perceptions as well.  They ran a study where the aid came in the form of a seemingly injured person, i.e., someone with an arm in a sling.  In those instances, the task didn’t seem lighter at all.

While saving for retirement is intimidating, if clients know they have an expert at their side, the burden will seem lighter.