45 things smart investors never say

Crosby_2015-150x150Dr. Daniel Crosby Executive Director, The Center for Outcomes & Founder, Nocturne Capital

1. Fear of political strife – “I don’t like the President”

2. Concentrated position – “My grandfather gave me this stock”

3. Impersonal benchmarks – “Why am I down versus the S&P 500?”

4. Market timing – “Is now a good time to invest?”

5. Home bias – “Europe? I prefer the Red, White, and Blue!”

6. Tangibility bias – “I like to invest in things that I can hold”

7. Friendship bias – “I like to invest in people I know”

8. Anchoring/ “breakevenitis” – “I’ll sell when it gets back to what I paid for it”

9. Selling winners too quickly – “You never go broke taking a profit”

10. Mere exposure effect – “Buy what you know”

11. Zero risk bias – “I’ll keep this dry powder for a rainy day”

12. Performance chasing – “This has been hot…”

13. IPO investing – “Have you heard of this new company…?”

14. Shifting risk tolerance – “I’m a high-risk high-reward person”

15. Ostrich effect – “Why mess with a good thing?” (complacency)

16. Confirmation bias – “All of my friends say…”

17. Overconfidence – “It won’t happen to me…”

18. Hindsight bias – “How did you do in 2008?”

19. Restraint bias – “I’ll jump on the next March 2009”

20. Self-serving bias – “Why aren’t my returns higher?” (two-way street)

21. Affect heuristic – “I’m going with my gut on this one…”

22. Appeal to authority – “But Jim Cramer said…”

23. Status quo bias – “Rebalance? Why bother?”

24. Hyperbolic discounting – “I’ll start saving later…”

25. Gambler’s fallacy – “I’m on a roll!”

26. Herding – “My friend told me to check out…”

27. New era thinking – “Yeah, but this time is different…”

28. Representativeness – “This will be the Great Depression all over again”

29. Bias blind spot – “But I would never do that!”

30. Ambiguity aversion – “Why can’t you just give me a straight answer?”

31. Babe Ruth Effect – “Why did you have me in last year’s big winner?”

32. Dread risk – “I’m gonna buy gold”/ “What about the zombie apocalypse?”

33. Fundamental attribution error – “Why aren’t you beating the market? I could do better myself!”

34. Illusory pattern recognition – “This chart looks just like 1929!”

35. Money illusion – “I’m a millionaire! What do you mean keep working?”

36. Myopic loss aversion – “Excuse me, I have to make some hedging trades.”

37. Sunk cost fallacy – “Well, we’ve already gone this far so…”

38. Turkey illusion – “Recession? Never heard of it.”

39. Fetish for complexity – “I need hedge fund exposure! What am I paying you for?”

40. Declinism – “The way I see it, the world is just going to hell”

41. Framing – “Save 10%? Impossible.”

42. Illusory truth effect (believing a market myth frequently repeat) – “Sell in May and go away”

43. Information bias – “Let me just turn on CNBC”

44. Outcome bias – “You told me not to buy individual stocks and it went up. Ha!”

45. Post-purchase rationalization – “I mean, I NEEDED that.”

The Center for Outcomes, powered by Brinker Capital, has prepared a system to help advisors employ the value of behavioral alpha across all aspects of their work – from business development to client service and retention. To learn more about The Center for Outcomes and Brinker Capital, call us at 800.333.4573.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Brinker Capital, Inc., a registered investment advisor.

Considering the use of benchmarks

Williams 150x150Dan Williams, CFA, CFPInvestment Analyst

A common, yet hard to answer, question for clients is “how are my investments doing?” By definition, the answer lies with benchmarks as a frame of reference but the semantics of their proper use often proves to be a stumbling block. Do you use a single broad index such as the S&P 500? Do you look at a risk equivalent blend of multiple broad indexes? Do you just look at the absolute return number? Additionally, do you look over the quarter, the year, or the decade of performance? Often the best way to properly use benchmarks is drilling down the context and the intent of this seemingly simple question.

This is to say, if the question is to assess how an investment portfolio is performing in the context of the current market environment, a blended benchmark of the neutral weights of a portfolio over a short time period is best. This is to say if you are looking at a large cap growth stock fund, you could look at the Russell 1000 Growth Index over the past quarter or year. If you wanted to judge a moderate risk portfolio with a neutral weight of 60% equity and 40% fixed income, you would turn to a blended benchmark of the same risk level over a similar period of time. However, while this shows how the portfolio is relatively performing currently, this comparison will serve as a poor judge of the true skill of the portfolio managers. Market conditions in the short-term favor different styles of investing over others. These preferences wax and wane over time with skilled managers proving their worth through the long-term of multiple market environments rather through every market environment.

Considering the use of benchmarks

As such, if the question is instead to evaluate the skill of a portfolio manager, the answer requires a much more rigorous analysis. You would like to see skill over various market environments and not just the current market environment. Accordingly, one of the many statistics that we look at is the percent of rolling 36-month periods that a strategy has outperformed its market benchmark. It is unreasonable to expect a strategy to outperform all such 3-year periods but a skilled manager should hope to do so more often than not. Additionally, looking at 7-year or longer time horizons provide a clearer view of how a manager faired after the dust has settled over one or more market cycles. As always looking at past performance only provides evidence of past skill and not necessarily future skill. The complete manager due diligence process extends beyond the numbers and requires additional work with regards to the qualitative characteristics of the managers and their organization.

A final way for this question to be asked is what should be most meaningful to the client. Specifically, how are the investments doing with regards to accomplishing the clients’ financial goals? Here we leave the market-based indexes behind and instead look to the absolute return numbers to determine if purchasing power is growing at a pace consistent with the investments savings goals. The time horizon of the evaluation should be consistent with the time horizon of the goal. In practice, a conservative portfolio that strives to deliver 3-5% a year for a goal that is 3-4 years away, should be evaluated by whether after 3-4 years if this return mandate is met. Similarly, an aggressive portfolio that strives to deliver 7-9% for a goal that is more than 10 years in the future should be evaluated over a period of at least 10 years against this return mandate. These return mandates could be further tweaked to be a spread in excess of inflation or a risk-free rate as clients’ goals are best defined as a growth in purchasing power rather than just a raw performance number.

It is clear that there is no one right way to tell clients how their investments are doing. Hopefully though helping clients define their “how are my investments doing” question can improve the relevance of the benchmarks and time horizons used to give an answer.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Brinker Capital, Inc., a registered investment advisor.

Investment Insights Podcast: What’s submerging Emerging Markets?

Tim Holland, CFA, Senior Vice President, Global Investment Strategist

On this week’s podcast (recorded July 6, 2018),
Tim discusses why 2018 is proving to be a very different story for EM equities relative to US and developed international equities.

Quick hits:

  • The MSCI EM Index is off approximately 6.5% year-to-date compared to a gain of 2.7% for the S&P 500 and a more modest loss of 2.4% for the MSCI EAFE, through the end of the second quarter.
  • While the volatility that accompanies EM equities can be unnerving, the long-term wealth building power of the asset class has been extraordinary.

For Tim’s full insights, click here to listen to the audio recording.

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The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

Investment Insights Podcast: June 2018 market and economic outlook

Leigh Lowman, CFA, Investment Manager

On this week’s podcast (recorded June 8, 2018), Leigh provides a brief review of May markets.

 

Quick hits:

  • Political risk dominated headlines with uncertainty escalating around the Trump administration trade policy, increasing tensions between the US and its trading partners.
  • The S&P 500 was up 2.4% for the month and up 2.0% year to date.
  • Developed international equities as measured by the MSCI EAFE Index was down -2.1% in May and is lagging domestic equities year-to-date.
  • The Bloomberg Barclays US Aggregate Index was positive for the month but is down -1.5% year-to-date.
  • Overall, we remain constructive on risk assets over the intermediate-term but recognize more normalized volatility will likely continue throughout the year.

Listen_Icon  Listen to the abbreviated audio recording.

Read_Icon  Read the full June Market and Economic Outlook.

 

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The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

 

Investment Insights Podcast: May 2018 market and economic outlook

Leigh Lowman, CFA, Investment Manager

On this week’s podcast (recorded May 11, 2018), Leigh provides a brief review of April markets.

 

Quick hits:

  • Higher market volatility persisted throughout April with risk asset performance mixed
  • The S&P 500 Index was up 0.4% for the month and down -0.4% year-to-date
  • Developed international equities as measured by the MSCI EAFE Index was up 2.4% in April and is outperforming domestic equities year-to-date
  • The Bloomberg Barclays US Aggregate Index was down -0.7% as fears of inflation and rising interest rates created headwinds for traditional fixed income securities
  • Overall we remain positive on risk assets over the intermediate-term as macroeconomic data continues to lean positive

Listen_Icon  Listen to the abbreviated audio recording.

Read_Icon  Read the full May Market and Economic Outlook.

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The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

 

Investment Insights Podcast: Investing a lump sum of cash

Raupp_F_150x150
Jeff Raupp, CFA
Director of Investments

On this week’s podcast (recorded April 20, 2018),
Jeff discusses the pros and cons of investing a lump sum immediately versus systematically investing an equal amount monthly.

Quick hits:

  • Almost 75% of the time an investor did better with the lump sum investment, with an average return after 12 months of about 8%, versus 4.2% for systematic investing.
  • A systematic plan may make sense for some, as it establishes a strategy for getting into the markets and takes emotion out of the equation.

For Jeff’s full insights, click here to listen to the audio recording.

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Performance returns source: Brinker Capital.
The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a registered investment advisor.

Investment Insights Podcast: April 2018 market and economic outlook

Leigh Lowman, CFA, Investment Manager

On this week’s podcast (recorded April 13, 2018), Leigh provides a brief review of March markets.

 

Quick hits:

  • After a tumultuous quarter, most asset classes ended slightly negative.
  • The S&P 500 Index finished the quarter slightly negative with sector performance largely negative.
  • Developed international equities were negative for the quarter, underperforming domestic equities.
  • Rising interest rates and fears of inflation led to volatile conditions for fixed income markets during the first quarter.
  • Despite the volatility experienced recently, we remain positive on risk assets over the intermediate-term.

Listen_Icon  Listen to the audio recording.

Read_Icon  Read the full April Market and Economic Outlook.

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The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

 

Investment Insights Podcast: As the first quarter comes to a close…


Andrew Goins
Investment Manager

On this week’s podcast (recorded March 29, 2018), Andrew reviews the markets as the first quarter comes to a close.

Quick hits:

  • January was very much a continuation of the momentum driven market of 2017, with the S&P 500 up 5.73% for the month, but that all changed as we rolled into February.
  • In addition to fears over trade wars and tariffs, a privacy scandal at Facebook as well as rhetoric around increasing regulation on mega cap tech companies has wreaked havoc on the FAANG stocks.
  • Despite the more recent weakness in the tech sector, growth stocks are still ahead of value so far this year.
  • We believe that active managers are positioned well to continue to take advantage of the higher volatility that is likely here to stay and should benefit as investors put a premium on quality and valuation.

For Andrew’s full insights, click here to listen to the audio recording.

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This is not a recommendation for Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix and Google. These securities are shown for illustrative purposes only.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

Investment Insights Podcast: March 2018 market and economic outlook

Leigh Lowman, CFA, Investment Manager

On this week’s podcast (recorded March 9, 2018), Leigh provides a brief review of February markets.

 

Quick hits:

  • Market volatility came roaring back in February with the VIX index surging to levels last seen in 2015 and washing out signs of complacency that were present earlier in the year.
  • The S&P 500 Index finished the month down -3.7% and is up 1.8% year to date.
  • Developed international equities underperformed domestic equities for the month.
  • Within fixed income all sectors posted negative returns.
  • Overall, we continue to remain positive on risk assets over the intermediate-term.

Listen_Icon  Listen to the audio recording.

Read_Icon  Read the full March Market and Economic Outlook.

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The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

 

Vlog – Trade wars are bad for business; Fortunately, we aren’t in one, yet

Brinker Capital’s Global Investment Strategist, Tim Holland, provides perspective on the Trump Administration’s tariff announcement.

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The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a registered investment advisor.