Where will you be when the dust settles?

Noreen D. BeamanNoreen D. Beaman, Chief Executive Officer

Since Donald Trump has been elected as the 45th President of the United States, the question we hear repeated most often is “what happens now?” While the immediate focus will be outlining transition of power plans, political appointments and the first 100 days of the Trump presidency, we’d be hard-pressed to find any expert who believes the uncertainty will end then.

Trump campaigned on a platform calling for sweeping change and dramatic deviations from the Obama administration. He wants to overhaul immigration policies, health coverage, taxation, and trade policies, all of which will have significant economic implications. His policies have yet to be clearly defined and we’ll have to wait to see if those policies will meet Congress and the Courts’ approval. There is also much speculation on who will be named to head the Treasury and whether he will follow through on his intention to replace Janet Yellen as Federal Reserve Chair. While these and many other economic dust particles swirl in the air, one thing we know for sure: the post-election uncertainties will create market volatility.

Even the savviest investor or most skilled asset manager cannot predict or control where the markets will land when the dust settles. So, instead of trying to glean actionable insights from uncertainty, we urge investors to focus on matters within control, such as:

  • An understanding that volatility is part of investing. In a recent blog, Dr. Daniel Crosby explained the impact elections have had on previous markets. It is worth re-reading and repeating that election cycles are like any other market cycles. Trends and patterns exist which may allow some securities and asset classes to outperform others. In light of the number and weight of the unknowns associated with a Trump presidency, the patterns of previous election cycles may bear little (if any) relevance to our experiences and decisions today. To put the volatility in perspective, try to repeat the lyrics of the famous Shirelle’s song, “Mama said there’d be days like this.” Volatility is part of investing and should not cause you to question your overall investment strategy. However, investors must seek to reduce volatility in their portfolio while maintaining the opportunity for appreciation.
  • Diversification can bring peace of mind. In addition to the economic benefits of investing broadly in a variety of asset classes, there are emotional gains to be made as well. When your portfolio spans asset classes, geographic regions, business sectors and investment styles, you know that while some conditions may be negative for one sector, they could be positive for others. You become less concerned about the performance of a particular asset class and focus more on how your total-return performance impacts your personal goals and benchmarks.
  • Your reliance on a competent advisor. Studies have shown that the greatest value provided by a financial advisor is behavioral coaching. It is in times of volatility and uncertainty that advisors earn their keep, so don’t be afraid to seek assurances and direction from your advisor.
  • A long-term perspective. Investing for the long-term can be daunting, so it may be helpful to remind yourself that it pays to wait. The worst return of any 25-year period was 5.9% annualized1. Time is on your side. As Crosby cautions, “Markets always have and always will climb a wall of worry, rewarding those who stay the course and punishing those who succumb to fear.”
  • Your goals are your benchmark. You have the power to control your actions, follow a plan, and make investment decisions on merit and not emotions. As John Coyne’s blog mentioned earlier in the week, it is important that you avoid emotions that could wreak havoc on a lifetime of careful planning. The degree with which you can maintain composure and stick with the plan put in place by your advisor is the single biggest predictor of where you will stand relative to your long-term financial goals when the dust settles.

Brinker Capital understands that investing for the long-term can be daunting, especially during a time like this but we are focused on providing multi-asset class investment solutions that help investors manage the emotions of investing to achieve their unique financial goals.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor. 

Investing involves risk, including risk of loss. Diversification does not ensure a profit or guarantee against loss. Past Performance is no guarantee of future results. 

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