Investment Insights Podcast: Outlook moving forward

Raupp_Podcast_GraphicJeff Raupp, CFA, Senior Vice President

On this week’s podcast (recorded December 2, 2016), Jeff provides an outlook moving forward given the price action we’ve seen since the election. Here are some quick hits before you have a listen:

 

  • There have been some clear winners and losers in the markets since the election:
    • Winners: U.S. stocks
    • Losers: International stocks and the bond markets
  • We may move out of the muddle through economy we’ve been in over the last several years to one that looks more like a traditional second half of the business cycle

 

For Jeff’s full insight, click here to listen to the audio recording.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

Investment Insights Podcast: Four Areas of Focus in the Last Quarter

Raupp_Podcast_GraphicJeff Raupp, CFA, Senior Vice President

On this week’s podcast (recorded October 21, 2016), Jeff highlights four focus areas to watch during the last quarter of 2016: the Fed, earnings, signs of recession, and the election.

  1. The Federal Reserve. Watch for a tightening of interest rates in December and dovish guidance (maintaining low interest rates) for 2017.
  2. Earnings. Watch for improvement in earnings as the pressure of low oil prices on energy companies starts to roll off.
  3. Signs of Recession. Watch for indicators that the business cycle is over. We believe we are in the second half of the cycle, and while it has been about seven years, economic growth has been more muted.
  4. Election. Watch for volatility as elections tend to cause uncertainty in the markets. However, markets tend to bounce back following elections as some of the uncertainty fades away.

For Jeff’s full insight, click here to listen to the audio recording.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

Investment Insights Podcast: Focusing In

Raupp_Podcast_GraphicJeff Raupp, CFA, Senior Vice President

On this week’s podcast (recorded September 23, 2016), Jeff focuses on three important events–third quarter earnings season, the election, and the Federal Reserve meeting in December. Highlights of his discussion include:

  • We view the negative impact on the energy sector to be mostly behind us, with year-over-year comparisons looking much more favorable.
  • The election, and the uncertainty it brings, will weigh on markets to some extent. Either way the election results go, we should have a little more clarity on forward policy, which is a positive.
  • A November interest rate hike is not off the table, but very unlikely. Prognosticators see a December hike becoming more likely.

For Jeff’s full insight, click here to listen to the audio recording.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

Earnings Season Upon Us, but Information Void Looms

Raupp_Podcast_GraphicJeff Raupp, CFA, Senior Investment Manager

On this week’s podcast (recorded August 1, 2016), Jeff covers the current themes impacting markets, including Brexit, earnings season, and the presidential election. Highlights of his discussion include:

  • Since the initial negative reaction from the Brexit vote in late June, markets have rebounded sharply, with U.S. stocks up over 15% since the June 27 lows and international stocks up over 10%.
  • Late summer and fall loom as somewhat of an information void, where economic data is a little sparser and investors have a harder time seeing the impetus for the next leg up in the market.
  • It wouldn’t be surprising to see a pause in the upward momentum in the markets until we get more clarity about the direction of the election.
  • This past week, housing, earnings, employment and wages all had positive reports, but were offset by a very disappointing GDP number.

For Jeff’s full insight, click here to listen to the audio recording.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

Investment Insights Podcast – The Good and Bad of Trading on Emotion

Raupp_Podcast_GraphicJeff Raupp, CFA, Senior Investment Manager

On this week’s podcast (recorded January 26, 2016), Jeff looks at the opportunities created via emotional selling while monitoring the negative factors at work in the economy:

  • Leading reasons for weakness in the marketplace continue to be falling oil prices and China’s slowing growth
  • Strength of the global economy is creating uncertainty.
  • When markets are volatile, it’s important to evaluate where markets may have overreacted and opportunity has been created.
  • Emotional trading seems to have generated attractive entry points into the market, but unique to an investor’s risk tolerance and time horizon.
  • Positives in the market include tame inflation and accommodative monetary policy; negatives include overtightening by the Federal Reserve.

For Jeff’s full insights, click here to listen to the audio recording

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change. Brinker Capital, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

Chasing Markets

Jeff RauppJeff Raupp, CFA, Senior Investment Manager, Brinker Capital

Back when I was in the U.S. Army, one thing I dreaded was the two-mile run as part of the Physical Fitness (PT) Test. I am not a runner. While most people would scoff at the notion of a two-mile run being intimidating, I looked at it as 13-14 minutes of pain. It was timed, and the better finishing times naturally resulted in a better score. Seemingly anything above 15 minutes resulted in a fail and, of course, more running.

One of the things I had the most trouble with was finding the right pace. I’d have instances where I’d try to run a balanced race only to end up having to sprint the last few hundred yards to reach my desired time. Then there were the times where I’d go out too hard and find myself stumbling into the finish line. The hills on the courses would complicate things – I’d kill myself trying to keep a constant pace uphill and downhill.

shutterstock_175699433After struggling with this for months, I came up with a better solution. We always ran as a group, and I found that I could usually find a few people that would consistently run around the same time I was looking for. Then my objective would be to keep up with them knowing that as long as I finished somewhere in their vicinity, I’d hit my goal.

The other day someone asked me whether investors’ financial goals should be to try to outperform the market, and with my response I thought there were a lot of similarities to my past running strategy.

An investor starts with an objective they’d like to get to, how much money they have, expected cash flows and their time horizon. From there it’s a matter of finding the right mix of asset classes that historically has shown a high probability of achieving the returns necessary to reach the objective(s). That mix can be thought of as your strategic plan.

Along the way, the market is a useful reference point. Investing isn’t a smooth journey, so when your strategy has drawdowns or grows faster than you expected, knowing how markets performed helps you determine if that’s just market volatility or if something may be wrong with your plan. Changing your strategic plan along the way can be dangerous, particularly at market extremes. If you’re always chasing the runner that looks the strongest at the moment, there’s a good chance you’ll burn out before the finish.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are for informational purposes only.

Investment Insights Podcast – February 5, 2015

Raupp_Podcast_GraphicJeff Raupp, CFA, Senior Investment Manager

On this week’s podcast (recorded January 31, 2015):

What we like: Yields on investment-grade and high-yield corporate bonds have moved higher; credit is strong fundamentally; investors indiscriminately selling credit securities

What we don’t like: Impact of lower oil prices on energy companies; possible creation of defaults

What we’re doing about it: Keeping current weight to credit, but opportunities arising due to credit selling; monitoring falling oil prices

Click here to listen to the audio recording

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice or recommendation. For informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change.

Simple is Better

Jeff RauppJeff Raupp, CFA, Senior Investment Manager, Brinker Capital

Simple can be harder than complex: You have to work hard to get your thinking clean to make it simple. But it’s worth it in the end because once you get there, you can move mountains. ~Steve Jobs

If you can’t explain it simply, you don’t understand it well enough. ~Albert Einstein

As an aspiring young basketball player in my pre-teens, I was fortunate enough to have my dad coach my township basketball team. When watching him draw up and teach a play for our team to execute, I decided I, too, could design a play for us. I guess I had always been a bit of an analytic. I went home and proceeded to design what might have been the most complex play ever developed, involving multiple players setting multiple picks, variations depending on how the defense reacted, and multiple passes that required each player’s timing to be nothing less than perfect. I proudly showed it to my dad. He appropriately praised me for the effort and then, to my dismay, declined to implement it Play Callingat the next practice. Naturally, I bothered him incessantly about it, as only kids can do, until he finally sat me down and walked through the play. He pointed out that while on paper the play looked great, if the execution or timing was even slightly off for any of the players, the entire thing broke down. As a team, we were still grappling with the idea of executing a simple pick and roll, so a play this complex was destined for failure. For our basketball team, simple was better.

Years later, I have found this lesson to be applicable in so many cases, particularly in investing. When you think of all the factors that can affect returns—economic factors, geopolitical issues, company specific factors, investor sentiment, government regulation, etc.—the tendency is to think that to be successful in such a complex environment you need to come up with a complex solution. Like my basketball play, complex investment solutions can often look great on paper, but fail to deliver.

I’ve interviewed hundreds, if not thousands of investment managers covering any asset class you can imagine. One of the things I’ve learned over the years is that if I can’t walk out of that interview with a good understanding of the key factors that will make their product successful and how that will help me, I’m better off passing on the strategy.

An instance that stands out to me is the time I visited a manager where we discussed an immensely elaborate strategy that tracked hundreds of factors to find securities that they believed were attractive. We visited the floor where the portfolio was managed by computing firepower and a collection of PhDs that rivaled NASA. You really couldn’t help but be impressed by the speed at which their systems could make decisions on new data and execute trades, and the algorithms they used to optimize their inputs used just about every letter in the Greek alphabet.

Raupp_Simple_3.28.14_1The conversation then went towards discussing how all of this translates to performance and it hit me—all of this firepower didn’t produce a result that I couldn’t get elsewhere from cheaper, less-complex strategies. So while I could appreciate all the work that went into putting the strategy together, I had a hard time seeing how the end results helped our investors. I felt that in creating an intellectually impressive structure, the firm had lost sight of the bottom line—delivering results to their investors.

This isn’t to say that all complex investment strategies aren’t worthwhile. We use many in our portfolios and over the years they’ve added significant value. We spend a lot of time analyzing the types of trades and opportunities that these managers look for and use. But I’ve found that if I can’t step back and articulate why I’d use a strategy in three or four bullet points, I’m better off walking away.

Most of the time you’re better off with the simple pick and roll.

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are for informational purposes only.

Everyone’s Unique

Jeff Raupp Jeff Raupp, CFA, Senior Investment Manager

Whenever I go to the bowling alley it strikes me how unique people are. And no, it’s not because of the multi-colored shoes or even the matching team jackets complete with catchy names like “Pin Pals” or “Medina Sod” sewn on the back. It’s because of the bowling balls.

Every time I head to the lanes, I can bank on spending at least ten minutes trying to find a ball that works for me. You have the heavy balls with the tiny finger holes and the huge thumb, the balls with the finger holes on the other side of the ball away from the thumb, and the ones where it seems like someone was playing around and drilled three random holes. Half of the time I find myself weighing the embarrassment of using a purple or pink ball that feels okay versus a more masculine black or red ball that weighs a ton but can only fit my pinkie. I’m always left thinking, “Where’s the guy or gal that this ball actually fits?”

Raupp_Everyones_Unique_2.14.14But at the end of the day, I find that if I find the right ball, where my hand feels comfortable and the weight is just right, I have a much better game.

In the same way, how to best save toward your life goals is unique to each investor. Even in the scenario where two investors have the same age, same investable assets and generally the same goals, the portfolio that helps them achieve those goals may be decidedly different between them. Investor emotion can play a huge role in the success or failure of an investment plan, and keeping those emotions in check is vital. There is nothing more damaging to the potential for an investor to meet their goals than an emotional decision to deviate from their long-term strategy due to market conditions.

Fortunately, there’s often more than one way to reach a particular goal. There are strategies that focus on total return versus ones that focus on generating income. Strategies that are more market oriented versus those that look to produce a certain level of return regardless of the markets. And there are tactical strategies and strategic strategies. For any investor’s personal goal(s), several of these, or a combination of these, might provide the necessary investment returns to get you there.

Raupp_Everyones_Unique_2.14.14_1Here’s where the emotions can come into play—if you don’t feel comfortable along the way, your emotions can take over the driver’s wheel, and your investor returns can fall short of your goal. In 2008-2009, many investors panicked, fled the markets, and decided to go to cash near the market bottom; but they missed much of the huge market rebound that followed. While in many cases the investors pre-recession strategy was sound and ultimately would have worked to reach their goals, their irrational decision during a period of volatility made it a tougher road.

Unfortunately, you don’t have the benefit of rolling a few gutter balls while you’re trying to find the right portfolio. That’s why working with an expert to find an investment strategy that can get you to your goals, and that matches your personality and risk profile, is vital to success.

Good bowlers show up at the alley with their own fitted ball and rightly-sized shoes. Good investors put their assets in a strategy fitted to their goals.

What About The Correction?

Jeff RauppJeff Raupp, CFA, Senior Investment Manager

Over the holidays, I spent a lot of time with some family members that I don’t often get to see. We got together, had a little too much to eat and drink, and gave each other updates on what’s happening in our lives. Between the updates on kids, new careers, and new houses (no new spouses or kids this year), we never miss the opportunity to get some free advice from one another.

My two sisters are both in healthcare and handle all questions related to our aches and pains. My cousin the mechanic will venture out to the driveway and listen to the ping in your engine for the cost of getting him a beer. You get the idea.

My contribution is on the investment side, fielding questions about 529 plans, IRA distributions, 401(k) plans, etc. But the biggest question is always some version of “where is the market going?” This year’s edition, fueled by the huge returns in stocks in 2013 (and a good dose of CNBC), was “do you think we’re going to get a market correction?”

Hello, My Name is Free AdviceI suggested that when you look at how far the market has run and the high levels of investor sentiment right now—indicating that a lot of good news is priced into the market— I could easily see the market pulling back 5-10% on some unexpected bad news. The natural response from my family was, “What should I do?” “Nothing,” was my presumably blunt response.

My rationale is this: From a fundamental standpoint, the market looks good. Companies continue to grow earnings at a steady, albeit slow, rate. The market isn’t cheap, but it isn’t expensive either, and rarely does P/E compress without a recession. Speaking of the r-word, GDP growth continues to be sluggish, but it’s positive and expected to increase in 2014. Housing, the root cause of the last recession, continues to improve in spite of rising rates. And the Fed launched the previously-dreaded tapering of its quantitative easing without any market hiccup.

Depending on the attention span of my audience, all of that might boil down to simply saying, “We could get a correction, but if you’ve got at least 6-12 months, I think the market will be positive from here.”

Now, let’s go check out that leak on my car…